Wind definitions

wĭnd
Wind can also mean to wrap something around or to turn a handle of a clock so that the clock will work properly.

An example of wind is to wrap lights around a tree.

An example of wind is when you turn the key on a grandfather clock.

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To wind is to take a path that is not straight.

An example of wind is a twisty path through the woods.

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Wind is a breeze or the movement of air.

An example of wind is the way the air moves and makes the tree branches rustle.

noun
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Moving air carrying sound, an odor, or a scent.
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Information, especially of something concealed; intimation.

Trouble will ensue if wind of this scandal gets out.

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Moving air, especially a natural and perceptible movement of air parallel to or along the ground.
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A movement of air generated artificially, as by bellows or a fan.
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The direction from which a movement of air comes.

The wind is north-northwest.

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A movement of air coming from one of the four cardinal points of the compass.

The four winds.

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Breath, especially normal or adequate breathing; respiration.

Had the wind knocked out of them.

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Gas produced in the stomach or intestines during digestion; flatulence.
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The brass and woodwinds sections of a band or orchestra.
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Wind instruments or their players considered as a group.
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Woodwinds.
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Something that disrupts or destroys.

The winds of war.

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A tendency; a trend.

The winds of change.

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Speech or writing empty of meaning; verbiage.

His remarks on the subject are nothing but wind.

noun
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Vain self-importance; pomposity.

An expert who was full of wind even before becoming famous.

noun
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To expose to free movement of air; ventilate or dry.
verb
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To cause to be out of or short of breath.
verb
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To afford a recovery of breath.

Stopped to wind and water the horses.

verb
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To detect the smell of; catch a scent of.
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To pursue by following a scent.
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To wrap (something) around a center or another object once or repeatedly.

Wind string around a spool.

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To wrap or encircle (an object) in a series of coils; entwine.

Wound her injured leg with a bandage; wound the waist of the gown with lace and ribbons.

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To introduce in a disguised or devious manner; insinuate.

He wound a plea for money into his letter.

verb
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To turn (a crank, for example) in a series of circular motions.
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To lift or haul by means of a windlass or winch.

Wind the pail to the top of the well.

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To go along (a curving or twisting course).

Wind a path through the mountains.

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To proceed on (one's way) with a curving or twisting course.
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To coil the spring of (a mechanism) by turning a stem or cord, for example.

Wind a watch.

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To coil (thread, for example), as onto a spool or into a ball.
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To remove or unwind (thread, for example), as from a spool.

Wound the line off the reel.

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To move in or have a curving or twisting course.

A river winding through a valley.

verb
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To be twisted or whorled into curved forms.
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To proceed misleadingly or insidiously in discourse or conduct.
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To become wound.

A clock that winds with difficulty.

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To move in or have a spiral or circular course.

A column of smoke winding into the sky.

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To be coiled or spiraled.

The vine wound about the trellis.

verb
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The act of winding.
noun
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A single turn, twist, or curve.
noun
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To blow (a wind instrument).
verb
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To sound by blowing.
verb
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To introduce deviously; insinuate.

Winding his prejudices through all his writings.

verb
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To hoist or haul by or as by winding rope on a winch.
verb
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To tighten the operating spring of (a clock, mechanical toy, etc.) by turning a stem or the like.
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To turn, or make revolve.

To wind a crank.

verb
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To move by or as if by cranking.
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To turn or coil (string, ribbon, etc.) around itself to form a ball or around something else so as to encircle it closely; twine; wreathe.

Winding the bandage on his finger.

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To wrap or cover by encircling with something turned in the manner of a coil; entwine.

To wind a spool with thread.

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To make (one's way) in a winding or twisting course.
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To cause to move in a winding or twisting course.
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To move, go, or extend in a curving, zigzagging, or sinuous manner; meander.
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To double on one's track, so as to throw off pursuers.
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To take a circuitous, devious, or subtle course in behavior, argument, etc.
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To insinuate oneself.
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To coil, twine, or spiral (about or around something)
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To undergo winding.

A watch that winds easily.

verb
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The act of winding.
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A single turn of something wound.
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A turn; twist; bend.
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Air in motion.
  • Any noticeable natural movement of air parallel to the earth's surface.
  • Air artificially put in motion, as by an air pump or fan.
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A strong, fast-moving, or destructive natural current of air; gale or storm.
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The direction from which a wind blows.
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A natural current of air regarded as a bearer of odors or scents, as in hunting.

To lose (the) wind of the fox.

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Figuratively, air regarded as bearing information, indicating trends, etc.

A rumor that's in the wind.

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Breath or the power of breathing.

To get the wind knocked out of one.

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Gas in the stomach or intestines; flatulence.
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Idle or empty talk; nonsense.
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Bragging; pomposity; conceit.
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The wind instruments of an orchestra, or the players of these instruments.
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Any of such instruments.
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To expose to the wind or air, as for drying; air.
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To get or follow the scent of; scent.
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To cause to be out of breath.

To be winded by a long run.

verb
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To rest (a horse, etc.) so as to allow recovery of breath.
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Designating a musical instrument sounded by blowing air through it, esp. a portable one sounded with the breath, as a flute, oboe, tuba, or trumpet.
adjective
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Of or for a wind or woodwind instrument or instruments.
adjective
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To blow (a horn, etc.)
verb
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To sound (a signal, etc.), as on a horn.
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River in WC Wyo., flowing southeast into the Bighorn: c. 110 mi (177 km)
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A current of air, especially a natural one that moves along or parallel to the ground, moving from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure. Surface wind is measured by anemometers or its effect on objects, such as trees. The large-scale pattern of winds on Earth is governed primarily by differences in the net solar radiation received at the Earth's surface, but it is also influenced by the Earth's rotation, by the distribution of continents and oceans, by ocean currents, and by topography. On a local scale, the differences in rate of heating and cooling of land versus bodies of water greatly affect wind formation. Prevailing global winds are classified into three major belts in the Northern Hemisphere and three corresponding belts in the Southern Hemisphere. The trade winds blow generally east to west toward a low-pressure zone at the equator throughout the region from 30° north to 30° south of the equator. The westerlies blow from west to east in the temperate mid-latitude regions (from 30° to 60° north and south of the equator), and the polar easterlies blow from east to west out of high-pressure areas in the polar regions.
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(countable, uncountable) Real or perceived movement of atmospheric air usually caused by convection or differences in air pressure.

The wind blew through her hair as she stood on the deck of the ship.

As they accelerated onto the motorway, the wind tore the plywood off the car's roof-rack.

The winds in Chicago are fierce.

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Air artificially put in motion by any force or action.

The wind of a cannon ball; the wind of a bellows.

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(countable, uncountable) The ability to exert oneself without feeling short of breath.

After the second lap he was already out of wind.

Give me a minute before we jog the next mile "” I need a second wind.

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(India and Japan) One of the five basic elements (See the Classical elements).
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(uncountable, colloquial) Flatus.

Eww. Someone just passed wind.

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Breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs, or by an instrument.
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A direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the "four winds".
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A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing.
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Mere breath or talk; empty effort; idle words.
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A bird, the dotterel.
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To blow air through a wind instrument or horn to make a sound.
verb
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To cause (someone) to become breathless, often by a blow to the abdomen.

The boxer was winded during round two.

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(reflexive) To exhaust oneself to the point of being short of breath.

I can't run another step "” I'm winded.

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(UK) To turn a boat or ship around, so that the wind strikes it on the opposite side.
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To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate.
verb
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The hounds winded the game.

verb
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To rest (a horse, etc.) in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe.
verb
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To turn coils of (a cord or something similar) around something.

To wind thread on a spool or into a ball.

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To tighten the spring of the clockwork mechanism such as that of a clock.

Please wind that old-fashioned alarm clock.

verb
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To entwist; to enfold; to encircle.
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(ergative) To travel, or to cause something to travel, in a way that is not straight.

Vines wind round a pole.

The river winds through the plain.

verb
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To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern.
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To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate.
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To cover or surround with something coiled about.

To wind a rope with twine.

verb
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The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist.
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Origin of wind

From Middle English, from Old English wind (“wind"), from Proto-Germanic *windaz, from Proto-Indo-European *hâ‚‚wéh₁nÌ¥ts (“blowing"), present participle of *hâ‚‚weh₁- (“to blow"). Cognate with Dutch wind, German Wind, West Frisian wyn, Swedish vind, Latin ventus, Welsh gwynt, perhaps Albanian bundë (“strong damp wind"); ultimately probably cognate with weather.