Hurricane meaning

hûr'ĭ-kān'
A severe, rotating tropical storm with heavy rains and cyclonic winds exceeding 74 mi (119 km) per hour, especially such a storm occurring in the Northern Hemisphere. Hurricanes originate in the tropical parts of the Atlantic Ocean or the Caribbean Sea and move generally northward. They lose force when they move over land or colder ocean waters.
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A low-pressure system will cause the clouds to rapidly circle counterclockwise (in the Northern Hemisphere) or clockwise (in the Southern Hemisphere). An eye will form in the center.
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An earlier set of utilities from McAfee that made a Windows PC faster. It provided such functions as memory compression, print spooling and disk file relocation.
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A storm is classified a hurricane when the winds reach a speed of 74 mph. After that point, a hurricane is categorized according to the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale:
  • Category 1, winds 74-95, minimal damage and flooding, 4-5 foot storm surge.
  • Category 2, winds 96-110, moderate damage to buildings, more damage to vegetation, flooding, 6-8 foot storm surge.
  • Category 3, winds 111-130, extensive damage to buildings, mobile homes destroyed, extensive flooding, 9-12 foot storm surge.
  • Category 4, winds 131-155, extreme damage to buildings, erosion of beach, massive flooding, 13-18 foot storm surge.
  • Category 5, winds more than 155, catastrophic damage with complete roof or building destruction, extreme flooding, over 18 foot storm surge.
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U.S. hurricane season is defined as June 1st to November 30th of each year, with the peak in September. The Atlantic coast peak is a bit earlier in the season, mainly between mid-August through mid-September.
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A hurricane needs a surface water temperature of at least 79 degrees Fahrenheit to warm the air at the ocean surface which then rises up, taking water in the form of vapor with it.
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A hurricane can form quickly within six hours, or it can take as long as 10 days.
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Converging winds at the ocean's surface collide pushing even more water vapor upwards, increasing warm air circulation and the wind speeds.
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Hurricanes make landfall between the Gulf of Mexico coast and the Florida peninsula.
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When a hurricane hits the ground, the bottom part of the hurricane slows down. The top part picks up even more speed and momentum and a tornado can form.
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A hurricane’s winds range from 74 mph and can exceed 155 mph, carry six to 12 inches of rainfall and bring storm surges near the coast.
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Most Atlantic hurricanes average nine days but the hurricanes that form in August average 12 days.
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Hurricanes can form tornadoes thousands of miles away from the original point of storm impact.
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Hurricanes are tracked with satellite pictures, rainfall measurements, 3-D measurements, windspeed measurements.
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East Pacific - Hurricane paths tend to gather near the western side of Central America.
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West Pacific - Hurricanes are located near either the Chinese mainland or the islands right off the shore.
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South Pacific - Hurricanes often take a path over land.

An example of a hurricane is the storm Katrina that hit New Orleans in 2005.

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Hurricane is defined as something that is as strong as a devastating storm.

An example of Hurricane is the nickname for a famous boxer.

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A severe tropical cyclone having winds greater than 64 knots (74 miles per hour; 119 kilometers per hour), originating in the equatorial regions of the Atlantic Ocean or Caribbean Sea or eastern regions of the Pacific Ocean, traveling north, northwest, or northeast from its point of origin, and usually involving heavy rains.
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A wind with a speed greater than 64 knots (74 miles per hour; 119 kilometers per hour per hour), according to the Beaufort scale.
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Something resembling a hurricane in force or speed.
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A violent tropical cyclone with winds moving at 74 or more miles per hour, often accompanied by torrential rains, and originating usually in the West Indian region: winds of hurricane force sometimes occur in the absence of a hurricane system.
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Anything like a hurricane in force and speed.
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A severe tropical cyclone in the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, or in the eastern North Pacific off the west coast of Mexico, with winds of 74 miles per hour (119 kph) or greater accompanied by rain, lightning, and thunder that sometimes moves into temperate latitudes.
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(meteorology) A wind scale for quite strong wind, stronger than a storm.
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(sports, aerial freestyle skiing) "full—triple-full—full" – an acrobatic maneuver consisting of three flips and five twists, with one twist on the first flip, three twists on the second flip, one twist on the third flip.
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A British fighter aircraft used during World War II, especially during the Battle of Britain.
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A town in West Virginia, United States, population 5,968 (2005 census estimate)
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A town in Utah, United States, population 9,748 (2004 Census estimate)
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The definition of hurricane is a storm with winds of 74 mph or more.
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Hurricanes are tropical cyclones that form over the warm, humid air near the equator in the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean.
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High pressure air at high altitudes pull even more heat away from the center of the storm, cooling the rising air resulting in further condensation and causing a faster release of heat energy. The high pressure air is pulled into the low-pressure center increasing the wind speeds.
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Origin of hurricane

  • Spanish huracán from Taíno hurákan Arawak kulakani thunder
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Spanish huracán, ultimately from the name of the Taino storm god Juracán whom the Taínos believed dwelled on El Yunque mountain and, when he was upset, sent the strong winds and rain upon them.
    From Wiktionary
  • Coined by Jeret Peterson
    From Wiktionary