Cyclone meaning

sīklōn
Frequency:
The definition of a cyclone is a violent rotating windstorm.

An example of cyclone is a tornado.

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Any of various devices using centrifugal force to separate materials.
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(meteorol.) A system of rotating winds over a vast area, spinning inward to a low pressure center (counterclockwise in the N Hemisphere) and generally causing stormy weather: commonly called a low, since it coexists with low barometric pressure.
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A violent rotating windstorm, especially a tornado.
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(loosely) A windstorm with a violent, whirling movement; tornado or hurricane.
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A low pressure system.
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(popular) The more or less violent, small-scale circulations such as tornadoes, waterspouts, and dust devils.
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A strong wind.
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A small-scale, violently rotating windstorm, such as a tornado or waterspout. Not in scientific use.
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A system of winds rotating around a center of low atmospheric pressure.
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A Southeastern and Indian Ocean weather phenomenon that results in wind speeds of around 150 to 200 km/h.
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A large-scale system of winds that spiral in toward a region of low atmospheric pressure. A cyclone's rotational direction is opposite to that of an anticyclone. In the Northern hemisphere, a cyclone rotates counterclockwise; in the Southern hemisphere, clockwise. Because low-pressure systems generally produce clouds and precipitation, cyclones are often simply referred to as storms. &diamf3; An extratropical cyclone is one that forms outside the tropics at middle or high latitudes. Extratropical cyclones usually have an organized front and migrate eastward with the prevailing westerly winds of those latitudes. &diamf3; A tropical cyclone forms over warm tropical waters and is generally smaller than an extratropical cyclone. Such a system is characterized by a warm, well-defined core and can range in intensity from a tropical depression to a hurricane.
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Origin of cyclone

  • From Greek kuklōn present participle of kukloun to rotate from kuklos circle kwel-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Coined by Henry Piddington, probably in the 1840s, and based on some term in Ancient Greek. Sources disagree on the date and on which Ancient Greek term, though it had to be something derived from either κύκλος (kuklos, “circle, wheel”) or κυκλόω (kukloō, “go around in a circle, form a circle, encircle”).

    From Wiktionary