Gust meaning

gŭst
A sudden burst, as of rain or smoke.
noun
5
3
To blow in gusts.
verb
1
3
(archaic) Relish; gusto.
noun
1
3
An outburst of emotion.
noun
1
5
(obsolete) To taste.
verb
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0
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(obsolete) To have a relish for.
verb
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0
Gust is defined as taste or the enjoyment of flavor.

An example of gust is the sweetness of a ripe pear.

An example of gust is swirling a fine wine in your mouth.

noun
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1
The definition of a gust is a powerful and unexpected rush of wind, air, rain, water, sound, smoke or fire.

An example of a gust is the air from a train going by very fast.

An example of a gust is the noise from a quickly opened door to a crowded dance club on an otherwise quiet street.

An example of a gust is the flames that happen just after a person squirts lighter fluid on a fire.

noun
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1
A strong, abrupt rush of wind.
noun
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1
A sudden, strong rush of air or wind.
noun
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1
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A sudden burst of rain, smoke, fire, sound, etc.
noun
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1
An outburst of laughter, rage, etc.
noun
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1
To blow in gusts.
verb
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1
Taste; relish; flavor; savor.
noun
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1
Enjoyment or appreciation.
noun
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1
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(scot.) To taste or relish.
verb
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1
noun
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1
Any rush or outburst (of water, emotion etc.).

noun
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1
(intransitive) To blow in gusts.
verb
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1
(archaic) The physiological faculty of taste.
noun
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1
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Intellectual taste; fancy.
noun
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1

Origin of gust

  • Middle English guste taste from Latin gustus gusto

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from Old Norse gustr gheu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin gustus ‘taste’. For the verb, compare Latin gustare, Italian gustare, Spanish gustar.

    From Wiktionary

  • Apparently from Old Norse gustr, though not recorded before Shakespeare.

    From Wiktionary