Waft definitions

wäft, wăft
To waft is defined as to cause something to move smoothly through air or over water.

An example of to waft is for the smell of sauce to travel through the house.

verb
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The definition of a waft is a gust of wind or a smell carried through the air.

An example of a waft is the scent of soup carried through the house.

noun
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To cause to go gently and smoothly through the air or over water.

The breeze wafted the fog through the fields.

verb
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To float easily and gently, as on the air; drift.

The smell of soup wafted from the kitchen.

verb
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Something, such as an odor, that is carried through the air.

A waft of perfume.

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A light breeze; a rush of air.

Felt the waft of the sea breeze.

noun
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The act or action of fluttering or waving.

The waft of her dress.

noun
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A flag used for signaling or indicating wind direction.
noun
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To beckon or signal to, as by a wave of the hand.
verb
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To carry or propel (objects, sounds, odors, etc.) lightly through the air or over water.
verb
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To transport as if in this manner.
verb
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To float, as on the wind.
verb
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To blow gently.
verb
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The act or fact of floating or being carried lightly along.
noun
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An odor, sound, etc. carried through the air.
noun
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A breath or gust of wind.
noun
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A wave, waving, or wafting movement.
noun
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(ergative) To (cause to) float easily or gently through the air.
verb
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(intransitive) To be moved, or to pass, on a buoyant medium; to float.
verb
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To give notice to by waving something; to wave the hand to; to beckon.
verb
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noun
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Something (a scent or od), such as a perfume, that is carried through the air.
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(nautical) A flag, (also called a waif or wheft), used to indicate wind direction or, with a knot tied in the center, as a signal.
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Origin of waft

Back-formation from wafter (armed convoy ship), alteration of Middle English waughter, from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German wachter (“a guard"), from to guard. The current senses derive from the original sense of "be carried by water". See also waif.