Flag meaning

flăg
To signal with or as with a flag; esp., to signal (the driver of a vehicle) to stop.
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(football) To penalize (a player, coach, etc.) during a game for a rule infraction.
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To pave with slabs of flagstone.
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(music) Any of the lines extending from a stem, indicating whether the note is an eighth, sixteenth, etc.
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To decorate or mark with flags.
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To send (a message) by signaling.
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To mark with or as with a flag.

To flag a word for deletion.

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The flower or leaf of any of these plants.
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To become limp; droop.
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To lose strength; grow weak or tired.

His energy flagged.

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(1) In communications, a code in the transmitted message which indicates that the following characters are a control code and not data.
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A technical analysis chart pattern that looks like a flag. A flag pattern shows upward price movement followed by declining price movement that is in a channel formation (meaning that is it constant and definite). The flag formation typically lasts just several weeks and shows a period of price congestion, or little movement, in prices. When the flag pattern ends, prices typically resume the direction of the trend that occurred before the flag.
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A marker or indicator of a condition, such as an error condition, in a program or file. See also file and program.
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In Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC), High-level Data Link Control (HDLC), and other frame-based communications protocols, a specific eight-bit pattern that alerts the receiving device to the beginning or end of a frame, i.e., message unit.The most commonly used flag character is 01111110 in binary code (7E in hexadecimal). Flags also fill all idle time on the line between frames. Only one flag is needed between frames. See also frame, HDLC, hexadecimal notation, protocol, and SDLC.
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A piece of cloth, often decorated with an emblem, used as a visual signal or symbol.
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(nautical) A flag flown by a ship to show the presence on board of the admiral; the admiral himself, or his flagship.
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(nautical, often used attributively) A signal flag.
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The use of a flag, especially to indicate the start of a race or other event.
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(computer science) A variable or memory location that stores a true-or-false, yes-or-no value, typically either recording the fact that a certain event has occurred or requesting that a certain optional action take place.
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(computer science) In a command line interface, a notation requesting optional behavior or otherwise modifying the action of the command being invoked.
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(often with up) To note, mark or point out for attention.

I've flagged up the need for further investigation into this.

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(computing) To signal (an event).

The compiler flagged three errors.

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(computing) To set a program variable to true.

Flag the debug option before running the program.

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(intransitive) To weaken, become feeble.

His strength flagged toward the end of the race.

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To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down, as flexible bodies; to be loose, yielding, limp.
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To let droop; to suffer to fall, or let fall, into feebleness.

To flag the wings.

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To enervate; to exhaust the vigour or elasticity of.
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Any of various plants with sword-shaped leaves, especially irises; specifically, Iris pseudacorus.
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A slab of stone; a flagstone, a flat piece of stone used for paving.
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(geology) Any hard, evenly stratified sandstone, which splits into layers suitable for flagstones.
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To lay down flagstones.
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A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of certain hawks, owls, etc.
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A group of elongated wing feathers in certain hawks.
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The bushy tail of a dog such as a setter.
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Flag is defined as to signal or mark something to get someone's attention.

An example of flag is to wave your hands at a cab driver to have him stop and pick you up.

An example of flag is marking pages in a book to read later.

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The definition of a flag is a piece of fabric attached to a pole usually with symbolic colors or patterns.

An example of flag is the banner with stars and stripes that hangs in front of fire stations in the United States.

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A piece of cloth, usually rectangular, of distinctive color and design, used as a symbol, standard, signal, or emblem.
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National or other allegiance, as symbolized by a flag.

Ships of the same flag.

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A ship carrying the flag of an admiral; a flagship.
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A marking device, such as a gummed strip of paper, attached to an object to attract attention or ease identification; a tab.
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The masthead of a newspaper.
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(music) A cross stroke that halves the value of a note to which it is added.
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A distinctively shaped or marked tail, as of a dog or deer.
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(computers) A variable or memory location that stores true-or-false, yes-or-no information.
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To mark with a flag or flags for identification or ornamentation.

Flag a parade route; flagging parts of a manuscript for later review.

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A plant, such as an iris or cattail, that has long sword-shaped leaves.
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To lose vigor or strength; weaken or diminish.

The conversation flagged.

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A flagstone.
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A piece of cloth or bunting, often attached to a staff, with distinctive colors, patterns, or symbolic devices, used as a national or state symbol, as a signal, etc.; banner; standard; ensign.
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(now rare) Long feathers or quills, as on a hawk.
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The tail of a deer.
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The bushy tail of certain dogs, as setters and some hounds.
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Something, as a tab of metal or cardboard, that is attached to a card, folder, etc. so that it may be found easily, as in a file.
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(comput.) A character, symbol, etc. used to mark data or a record for special attention.
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(UK) An abbreviation for capture the flag.
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To furnish or deck out with flags.
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To mark with a flag, especially to indicate the importance of something.
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(often with down) To signal to, especially to stop a passing vehicle etc.

Please flag down a taxi for me.

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To convey (a message) by means of flag signals.

To flag an order to troops or vessels at a distance.

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dip the flag
  • to salute by lowering a flag briefly
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

dip the flag

Origin of flag

  • Middle English flagge piece of turf from Old Norse flaga slab of stone plāk-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Possibly of Scandinavian origin Old Norse flögra to flap about

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English flagge reed of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English flag, flagge (“flag”), further etymology uncertain. Perhaps from or related to early Middle English flage (“name for a baby's garment”) and Old English flagg, flacg (“cataplasm, poultice, plaster”). Related to Dutch vlag (“flag”), German Flagge (“flag”), Swedish flagg (“flag”), Danish flag (“flag, ship's flag”). Compare also Middle English flacken (“to flutter, palpitate”), Swedish dialectal flage (“to flutter in the wind”), Old Norse flögra (“to flap about”). Akin to Old High German flogarōn (“to flutter”), Old High German flogezen (“to flutter, flicker”), Middle English flakeren (“to move quickly to and fro”), Old English flacor (“fluttering, flying”). More at flack, flacker.

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Icelandic flag

    From Wiktionary

  • Of uncertain origin; compare Danish flæg.

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably from Old Norse.

    From Wiktionary