Wilt definitions

wĭlt
Wilt means to become limp.

An example of wilt is for a flower to fold in half after it hasn't had water for a few days.

An example of wilt is for a person to become faint after heavy exertion.

verb
1
0
To wilt is to get weak.

An example of to wilt is to get very hot and feel faint.

verb
0
0
To become limp or flaccid; droop.

Plants wilting in the heat.

verb
0
0
To feel or exhibit the effects of fatigue or exhaustion; weaken markedly.
verb
0
0
To cause to droop or lose freshness.

The heat wilted the flowers.

verb
0
0
To deprive of energy or vigor; fatigue or exhaust.

Worry wilted the parents.

verb
0
0
The action of wilting or the state of being wilted.
noun
0
0
Any of various plant diseases characterized by slow or rapid collapse of terminal shoots, branches, or entire plants.
noun
0
0
To become limp, as from heat or lack of water; wither; droop.
verb
0
0
To become weak or faint; lose strength; languish.
verb
0
0
To lose courage; quail.
verb
0
0
To cause to wilt.
verb
0
0
A wilting or being wilted.
noun
0
0
A highly infectious disease of some caterpillars, in which the carcasses liquefy.
noun
0
0
Any of several plant diseases caused by certain bacteria or fungi and characterized by wilting of the leaves.
noun
0
0
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To droop or become limp and flaccid (as a dying leaf or flower).
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To fatigue; to lose strength.
verb
0
0
To cause to droop or become limp and flaccid (as a flower).
verb
0
0
To cause to fatigue; to exhaust.
verb
0
0
The act of wilting or the state of being wilted.
noun
0
0
Any of various plant diseases characterized by wilting.
noun
0
0
(archaic) Second-person singular simple present form of will.
verb
0
0

Origin of wilt

Recorded since 1691, probably an alteration of welk, itself from Middle English welken, presumed from Middle Dutch (preserved in modern inchoative verwelken) or Middle Low German welken (“to wither"), cognate with Old High German irwelhen (“to become soft").