Wither meaning

wĭthər
To dry up, as from great heat; shrivel; wilt.
verb
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To dry up or shrivel from loss of moisture.
verb
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To render speechless or incapable of action; stun.

The teacher withered the noisy student with a glance.

verb
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To lose vigor or freshness; become wasted or decayed.
verb
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To weaken; languish.

Affection that soon withered.

verb
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To cause to wither.
verb
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To cause to quail or feel abashed, as by a scornful glance.
verb
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(obsolete or chiefly in compounds) Against, in opposition to.
adverb
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(obsolete) To go against, resist; oppose.
verb
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(intransitive) To shrivel, droop or dry up, especially from lack of water.
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To cause to shrivel or dry up.
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(intransitive, figuratively) To lose vigour or power; to languish; to pass away.
verb
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(intransitive) To become helpless due to emotion.
verb
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To make helpless due to emotion.
verb
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(now chiefly UK dialectal, Scotland) Prefix meaning: "against", "in opposition to"; "in return"; "counter-"; "contrary (to)"; "in the opposite direction (of or to)"; "backwards".
prefix
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To wither is to shrivel up, to become dry, or to weaken and droop.

When you become old and sickly and unable to walk, this is an example of a situation where you wither away.

When a plant isn't watered and it dries up, this is an example of wither.

When interest in a social program wanes and it begins to stop being funded and operated, this is an example of a situation where the program withers away.

verb
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To lose force or vitality; become diminished; wane.
verb
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To cause to shrivel or fade.
verb
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To cause to lose force or vitality; diminish or destroy.
verb
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1

Origin of wither

  • Alteration of Middle English widderen perhaps variant of wederen to weather from weder weather weather

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old English wiþer (“again, against", adverb in compounds), from Proto-Germanic *wiþra (“against, toward"), from Proto-Indo-European *wÄ«-tero- (“further apart"), *wÄ«- (“separate, alone"). Cognate with Low German wedder (“against"), Dutch weer (“again, back"), German wider (“against, contrary to"), wieder (“again"), Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐌸𐍂𐌰 (wiþra), Old Norse viðr. More at with.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old English wiþer (“again, against”, adverb in compounds), from Proto-Germanic *wiþra (“against, toward”), from Proto-Indo-European *wī-tero- (“further apart”), *wī- (“separate, alone”). Cognate with Low German wedder (“against”), Dutch weer (“again, back”), German wider (“against, contrary to”), wieder (“again”). More at with.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English widren, wydderen (“to dry up, shrivel"), related to or perhaps an alteration of Middle English wederen (“to expose to weather"), from Old English wederian (“to expose to weather, exhibit a change of weather"). Compare Dutch verwederen, verweren (“to erode by weather"), German verwittern (“to be ruined by weather; to erode"). More at weather.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English witheren, from Old English wiþerian (“to resist, oppose, struggle against"), from Proto-Germanic *wiþrōnÄ… (“to go against, resist"). Cognate with Middle Dutch wideren, Old High German widarōn.

    From Wiktionary