Withe meaning

wĭth, wĭth, wīth
A tough supple twig, especially of willow, used for binding things together; a withy.
noun
0
0
A tough, flexible twig of willow, osier, etc., used for binding things; withy.
noun
0
0
To bind with withes.
verb
0
0
A flexible, slender twig or shoot, especially when used as a band or for binding; a withy.
noun
0
0
(nautical) An iron attachment on one end of a mast or boom, with a ring, through which another mast or boom is rigged out and secured.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
(architecture) A partition between flues in a chimney.
noun
0
0
To bind with withes.
verb
0
0
To beat with withes.
verb
0
0

Origin of withe

  • Middle English from Old English withthe wei- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English withe, withthe, from Old English wiþe, wiþþe (“cord, band, thong, fetter"), from Proto-Germanic *wiþiz, *wiþjÇ­ (“cord, rope"), from Proto-Indo-European *weyt- (“that which winds or bends, branch, switch"), from Proto-Indo-European *wey- (“to turn, wind, bend"). Cognate with Danish vidje (“wicker"), Swedish vidja (“withe, wicker, osier"), Icelandic við, viðja (“a withe"), Latin vÄ«tis (“vine").
    From Wiktionary