With meaning

wĭth, wĭth
In the membership or employment of.

Plays with a jazz band; is with a publishing company.

preposition
13
4
In the company of; accompanying.

Did you go with her?

preposition
11
4
In the same group or mixture as; among.

Planted onions with the carrots.

preposition
8
3
In spite of.

With all her experience, she could not get a job.

preposition
6
0
So as to be touching or joined to.

Coupled the first car with the second; linked arms with their partners.

preposition
5
0
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Of the same opinions, beliefs, etc. as.

I'm with you there.

preposition
2
0
As a result or consequence of.

Trembling with fear; sick with the flu.

preposition
2
4
In the opinion or estimation of.

If it's all right with you.

preposition
1
0
In proportion to.

Wines that improve with age.

preposition
1
0
As company; along.

We're going to the movies. Are you coming with?

adverb
1
0
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In the opinion of; in the opinion held by.

My decision is all right with her.

preposition
1
0
As a result of; because of.

Faint with hunger.

preposition
1
0
From.

To part with one's gains.

preposition
1
0
Following upon; after.

With that remark, he left.

preposition
1
0
Used to indicate simultaneous happening, or immediate succession or consequence.
preposition
1
1
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In the same direction as.

Sail with the wind; flow with the river.

preposition
1
4
In comparison or contrast to.

A car identical with the one her sister just bought.

preposition
0
0
In opposition to or competition facing; against.

To argue with a friend, to vie with the champions.

preposition
0
0
As an associate, or companion, of.

To play golf with one's son.

preposition
0
0
In the same terms as; compared to; contrasted to.

Having equal standing with the others.

preposition
0
0
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As well as, as completely as, etc.

Able to field a ball with the best.

preposition
0
0
In support of; on the side of.

Voting with the Tories.

preposition
0
0
Having as a possession, attribute, accouterment, etc.; bearing, wearing, or owning.

The man with brown hair.

preposition
0
0
Showing or exhibiting.

To play with skill.

preposition
0
0
In the keeping, care, etc. of.

The children were left with the baby sitter.

preposition
0
0
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In spite of; notwithstanding.

With all his boasting, he is a coward.

preposition
0
0
To; onto.

Join one end with the other.

preposition
0
0
Away, back.

Withdraw.

affix
0
0
Against, from.

Withhold.

affix
0
0

He picked a fight with the class bully.

preposition
0
0
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In the company of; alongside, along side of; close to; near to.

He went with his friends.

preposition
0
0
In addition to; as an accessory to.

She owns a motorcycle with a sidecar.

preposition
0
0
In support of.

We are with you all the way.

preposition
0
0
C1388, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Legend of Good Women, Balade, 266

Ysiphile, betrayed with Jasoun, / Maketh of your trouthe neyther boost ne soun;

preposition
0
0
1610, William Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale, Act V, V-ii.

He was torn to / pieces with a bear.

preposition
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0
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1669, Nathaniel Morton, New England's Memorial.

He was sick and lame of the scurvy, so as he could but lie in the cabin-door, and give direction, and, it should seem, was badly assisted either with mate or mariners.

preposition
0
0
Slain with robbers.
preposition
0
0
As an instrument; by means of.

Cut with a knife.

preposition
0
0
Having, owning.
preposition
0
0
(Midwestern US) Along, together with others/group etc.

Do you want to come with?

adverb
0
0
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Alternative form of withe.
noun
0
0
Next to; alongside of.

Stood with the rabbi; sat with the family.

preposition
0
1
In the charge or keeping of.

Left the cat with the neighbors.

preposition
0
1
At the same time as.

Gets up with the birds.

preposition
0
1
Having received.

With her permission, he left. I escaped with just a few bruises.

preposition
0
1
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In opposition to; against.

Wrestling with an opponent.

preposition
0
1
So as to be free of or separated from.

Parted with her husband.

preposition
0
1
In the course of.

We grow older with the hours.

preposition
0
1
In relationship to.

At ease with my peers.

preposition
0
1
As well as; in favorable comparison to.

She could sing with the best of them.

preposition
0
1
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According to the experience or practice of.

With me, it is a question of priorities.

preposition
0
1
Used as a function word to indicate close association.

With the advent of the rockets, the Space Age began.

preposition
0
1
With is defined as accompanied by, coming at the same time as, going along in the same direction, related or in proportion to, or accompanied by.

An example of with is when you and Tim go to the store together.

An example of with is when maturity comes at the same time as advanced age comes.

An example of with is when you go along in the same direction as the crowd.

An example of with is when steak and eggs are served together.

An example of with is when you cut wood using a saw.

preposition
0
2
in with
  • In league or association with:.
    He is in with the wrong crowd.
idiom
0
0
with it
  • Interested in and sensitive to the latest styles and trends; up-to-date.
  • Streetwise and knowing; savvy.
  • Mentally competent.
idiom
0
0
with that
  • After, or as a consequence of, that.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of with

  • ME < OE < with: see with

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English with, against, from from Old English wi- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English with, from Old English wiþ (“against, opposite, toward"), a shortened form of wiþer, from Proto-Germanic *wiþr- (“against"), from Proto-Indo-European *wi-tero- (“more apart"); from Proto-Indo-European *wi (“separation"). Cognate with German wider (“against") and wieder (“again"), Dutch weer (“again"), Danish ved (“by, near, with"), Swedish vid (“by, next to, with"). In Middle English, the word shifted to denote association rather than opposition, displacing Middle English mid (“with"), from Old English mid (“with"), which is cognate to Old-Frisian mith (“with"), Modern Frisian mei (“with"), Dutch met (“with") and German mit (“with").

    From Wiktionary