Sear meaning

sîr
Frequency:
To sear is defined as to dry up, burn or quickly brown meat.

An example of to sear is to quickly brown a piece of salmon on the stove.

verb
2
0
The definition of a sear is a scar from burning, browning or drying up, or the catch in a gunlock.

An example of a sear is a mark on a piece of meat from cooking.

An example of a sear is part of a gun that keeps the hammer partially or fully-cocked.

noun
2
0
Sear means dried up.

An example of sear used as an adjective is in the phrase "sear plants" which means plants that have dried up and died.

adjective
2
1
To char, scorch, or burn the surface of.
verb
1
0
To brown (meat) quickly using very high heat.
verb
1
0
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To cause to dry up and wither.
verb
0
0
To become dried up or withered.
verb
0
0
To be felt or remembered because of emotional intensity.

The incident seared into the nation's memory.

verb
0
0
A condition, such as a scar, produced by searing.
noun
0
0
The catch in a gunlock that keeps the hammer halfcocked or fully cocked.
noun
0
0
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adjective
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To dry up; wither.
verb
0
0
To brand or cauterize with a hot iron.
verb
0
0
To make callous or unfeeling; harden.
verb
0
0
To cause to quail or feel humiliated, as by a scornful glance.
verb
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0
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(archaic) To dry up; wither.
verb
0
0
A mark or condition caused by searing.
noun
0
0
The catch in a gunlock that holds the hammer cocked or half-cocked.
noun
0
0
Dry; withered, especially of vegetation.
adjective
0
0
To char, scorch, or burn the surface of something with a hot instrument.
verb
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0
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To wither; to dry up.

verb
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0
(figuratively) To mark permanently, as if by burning.

The events of that day were seared into her memory.

verb
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0
A scar produced by searing.
noun
0
0
Part of a gun that retards the hammer until the trigger is pulled.
noun
0
0

Origin of sear

  • Probably French serre something that grasps from Old French lock from serrer to grasp from Vulgar Latin serrāre from Late Latin serāre to bolt from Latin sera bar, bolt ser-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English seren from Old English sēarian to wither from sēar withered

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English seer, seere, from Old English sÄ“ar, sÄ«ere (“dry, sere, sear, withered, barren"), from Proto-Germanic *sauzaz (“dry"), from Proto-Indo-European *saus-, *sus- (“dry, parched"). Cognate with Dutch zoor (“dry, rough"), Low German soor (“dry"), German sohr (“parched, dried up"), Norwegian dialectal søyr (“the desiccation and death of a tree"), Lithuanian sausas (“dry").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English seeren, seren, from Old English sÄ“arian (“to become sere, to grow sear, wither, pine away"), from Proto-Germanic *sauzōnÄ…, *sauzijanÄ… (“to become dry"). Related to Old High German sōrÄ“n (“to wither, wilt"), Greek hauos ("dry"), Sanskrit sōsa ("drought"). The use in firearms terminology may relate to French serrer ("to grip").

    From Wiktionary