Scathe meaning

skāth
Scathe is to harm or damage, or to fiercely denounce or criticize.

When you accidentally brush up against a mailbox with your car and scratch your car, this is an example of when you scathe the car.

When a politician makes hurtful remarks about their opponent, this is an example of when the politician scathes the opponent.

verb
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Scathe is a harm or injury.

A scratch on a car is an example of a scathe.

noun
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To harm or injure, especially by fire.
verb
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To criticize or denounce severely; excoriate.
verb
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Harm or injury.
noun
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To denounce fiercely.
verb
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Injury or harm.
noun
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noun
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(archaic) To injure.
verb
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Origin of scathe

  • Middle English skathen from Old Norse skadha

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English scathen, skathen, from Old English sceaþan, scaþan (“to scathe, hurt, harm, injure") and Old Norse skaða (“to hurt"); both from Proto-Germanic *skaþōnÄ… (“to injure"). Cognate with Danish skade, German schaden, Swedish skada; compare Gothic 𐍃𐌺𐌰𐌸𐌾𐌰𐌽 (skaþjan), Old Norse skeðja (“to hurt"). Compare Ancient Greek ἀσκηθής (askÄ“thÄ“s, “unhurt"), Albanian shkathët (“skillful, adept, clever"), Polish skaleczyć (“to hurt, scathe").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English scathe, from Old English sceaþa (also sceaþu) ("scathe, harm, injury"), from Proto-Germanic *skaþô (“damage, scathe"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kÄ“t- (“damage, harm").

    From Wiktionary