Scat meaning

skăt
The definition of scat is a type of jazz singing where meaningless sounds are improvised and added to the vocals.

An example of scat singing is when a jazz singer adds vocal syllables in conjunction with the sounds from the musical instruments.

adjective
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(music, jazz) To sing an improvised melodic solo using nonsense syllables, often onomatopoeic or imitative of musical instruments.
verb
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Jazz singing in which improvised, meaningless syllables are sung to a melody.
noun
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To sing scat.
verb
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To go away hastily; leave at once.
verb
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(music, jazz) Scat singing.
noun
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Excrement, especially of an animal; dung.
noun
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To go away.
verb
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Designating or of singing in which meaningless syllables are improvised, often in imitation of the sounds of a musical instrument.
adjective
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Such singing.
noun
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To engage in scat singing.
verb
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Excrement left by an animal, esp. a wild animal.
noun
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Excrement, especially of an animal; dung.
noun
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noun
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(UK dialectal) A land-tax paid in the Shetland Islands.
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(biology) Animal excrement; dung.
noun
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(slang) Heroin.
noun
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(slang) Coprophilia.
noun
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(UK, dialect) A brisk shower of rain, driven by the wind.

When Halldown has a hat, Let Kenton beware of a Skatt. "” Risdon.

noun
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(colloquial) To leave quickly (often used in the imperative).

Here comes the principal; we'd better scat.

verb
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(colloquial) An imperative demand, often understood by speaker and listener as impertinent.

Scat! Go on! Get out of here!

verb
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To scat is to go away or leave.

When you scamper outside to play, this is an example of a time when you scat.

verb
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Origin of scat

  • Origin unknown
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Origin unknown
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Origin unknown
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English scet, schat, from Old English sceatt (“property, goods, owndom, wealth, treasure; payment, price, gift, bribe, tax, tribute, money, goods, reward, rent, a tithe; a piece of money, a coin; denarius, twentieth part of a shilling") and Old Norse skattr (“wealth, treaure, tax, tribute, coin"); both from Proto-Germanic *skattaz (“cattle, kine, wealth, owndom, goods, hoard, treasure, geld, money"), from Proto-Indo-European *skatn-, *skat- (“to jump, skip, splash out"). Cognate with Scots scat (“tax, levy, charge, payment, bribe"), West Frisian skat (“treasure, darling"), Dutch schat (“treasure, hoard, darling, sweetheart"), German Schatz (“treasure, hoard, wealth, store, darling, sweetheart"), Swedish skatt (“treasure, tax, duty, jewel"), Icelandic skattur (“tax, tribute"), Latin scateō (“gush, team, bubble forth, abound").
    From Wiktionary
  • Origin uncertain. Perhaps from English dialectal scat (“to scatter, fling down, bespatter"), or an alteration of shit (past tense shat; compare Old English scāt), also used for "drugs, heroin". Given the given popular character of the word and unmotivated derivation pattern, derivation from Ancient Greek σκῶρ (skōr, skat-, “excrement") is unlikely
    From Wiktionary
  • Perhaps from the interjection scat!, itself an interjectional form of scoot! or scout!, from the root of shoot. Alternatively, from the expression quicker than s'cat (“in a great hurry"), perhaps representing a hiss followed by the word cat. Compare Swedish schas! (“shoo!, begone!").
    From Wiktionary
  • Probably imitative.
    From Wiktionary