Tax meaning

tăks
A heavy demand; burden; strain.
noun
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Tax is a required payment on goods, property, etc. that goes to the government.

An example of a tax is a portion taken out of weekly paychecks and sent to the government.

noun
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Tax is defined as to make people pay a percentage of money to the government.

An example of to tax is to charge citizens self employment tax at the end of the year.

verb
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To exact a tax from.

Taxed the people.

verb
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A contribution for the support of a government required of persons, groups, or businesses within the domain of that government.
noun
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A fee or dues levied on the members of an organization to meet its expenses.
noun
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A burdensome or excessive demand; a strain.
noun
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To place a tax on (income, property, or goods).
verb
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To assess (court costs, for example).
verb
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See income tax.
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To assess a tax on (income, property, purchases, etc.)
verb
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To make difficult or excessive demands upon.

A boss who taxed everyone's patience.

verb
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To determine the value of; assess.
verb
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To impose a burden on; put a strain on.

Such babbling taxes one's patience.

verb
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To accuse; charge.

To be taxed with negligence.

verb
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A charge assessed on an individual or on property for the purpose of supporting the functioning of the government. Such charges may be imposed on sale of property or goods, imports, exports, wages and income, privileges, and just about anything else that one can think of. Although usually thought of as being monetary in nature, it is not necessarily so. The act of imposing a charge upon individuals or property by a government or other taxing authority; to strain or place weight upon.
verb
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See abate.
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A flat tax originally imposed upon corporations or individuals with high incomes in the event that they wrote off all their income through use of deductions, credits, and contributions. It was enacted to make sure that these parties paid at least some income tax, but it also can affect middle-income families.
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See gain.
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A tax imposed on the property of a decedent that diminishes the value of the total estate to the inheritor. See also inheritance tax.
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A quarterly amount paid by persons whose income is not subject to witholding tax, in anticipation of what that person’s income tax liability will be come April 15 of the following year.
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A tax that remains a constant percentage regardless of the size of the amount being taxed. Most state sales taxes are flat taxes.
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See gift tax.
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See hidden tax.
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A tax imposed upon the inheritor of property, sometimes known as a succession tax. There is no federal inheritance tax, but many states have statutes imposing such taxes. See also estate tax.
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. See poll tax.
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See progressive tax.
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An ad valorem tax upon (usually) real property, usually imposed by states and municipalities in order to support local and state services, such as schooling and policing.
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A tax that creates a greater burden on those less well off than on those with a higher income. The structure of most sales taxes make them regressive in nature. See also progressive tax.
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A tax on the selling price of goods and some services levied by some states and some municipalities. Those goods and services taxed varies from state to state, as does the rate of taxation. The tax is usually a fixed percentage of the price and is tacked onto that price. See also flat tax.
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An amount tacked onto an already taxed article, or onto the tax itself; a surcharge. See also surcharge.
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Same as an estate tax.
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A federal law that imposes a tax on the net worth of an estate and on gifts of and above a certain amount. Both estates and lifetime gifts are treated the same way, with the transferror being responsible for the payment of the tax, but with the responsibility passing to the transferee in the event that the former fails to pay it. Also known as the unified transfer tax.
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A tax imposed by some jurisdictions on goods bought outside that jurisdiction, and so not subject to that jurisdiction’s sales tax. It is usally set at the same rate as the sales tax and is meant to discourage shopping outside the jurisdiction. See also sales tax.
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A tax imposed at each step in the production or construction of a manufactured good based upon the difference between the cost of producing the item and its selling price. Abbreviated V.A.T.
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The amount of income tax that is witheld from the paychecks of employees and sent directly to the government by the employer. It is counted as a credit toward that individual’s tax liability when tax returns are filed.
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Money paid to the government other than for transaction-specific goods and services.
noun
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A heavy tax on time or health.

noun
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A task exacted from one who is under control; a contribution or service, the rendering of which is imposed upon a subject.
noun
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To impose and collect a tax from (a person).

Some think to tax the wealthy is the fairest.

verb
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To impose and collect a tax on (something).

Some think to tax wealth is destructive of a private sector.

verb
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To make excessive demands on.
verb
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In proportion to its value; a proportional tax imposed upon something’s value, rather than on its quantity (especially on real property).
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Origin of tax

  • Middle English from taxen to tax from Old French taxer from Medieval Latin taxāre from Latin to touch, reproach, reckon frequentative of tangere to touch tag- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Anglo-Norman taxer (“to impose a tax"), from Latin taxāre, present active infinitive of taxō (“I handle", “I censure", “I appraise", “I compute").

    From Wiktionary