Cost definition

kôst
To have as a price.
verb
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An amount paid or required in payment for a purchase; a price.
noun
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3
The expenditure of something, such as time or labor, necessary for the attainment of a goal.
noun
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4
To estimate or determine the cost of.

The accountants costed out our expenses.

verb
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3
To cause or require the expenditure, loss, or experience of.

Victory cost him his health.

verb
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The definition of cost is the amount paid for something or the expense of doing something.

An example of a cost is $3 for a half gallon of milk.

noun
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(informal) To be expensive.
verb
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In telecommunications, the cost of transmitting data along a given path or route can be measured in terms of bandwidth consumption and quality of service (QoS) parameters such as number of hops, total latency, bit error rate (BER), and packet loss, or any number of considerations other than the direct monetary cost of passing traffic to another carrier or service provider. See also bandwidth, BER, carrier, hop, latency, path, packet, QoS, route, and traffic.
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Cost is defined as to be priced at something or to lose.

An example of cost is for a loaf of bread to be priced at $3.

An example of cost is to give up your freedom to give freedom to another person.

verb
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1
(law) Charges incurred in bringing litigation, including court fees and charges that may be payable by the losing party, but usually not including attorneys' fees.
noun
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To be obtained or obtainable for (a certain price); be priced at.
verb
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The amount of money paid to acquire something, or spent in producing something.
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The amount spent in producing or manufacturing a commodity.
noun
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The amount paid for something by a dealer, contractor, etc.: a markup is usually added to arrive at a selling price.

Stoves sold at cost in a special sale.

noun
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The amount of money, time, effort, etc. required to achieve an end.
noun
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Loss, sacrifice; detriment.

To smoke at the cost of one's health.

noun
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The amount of time, effort, or other resources expended in accomplishing something.
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At all costs (= "by all means")

noun
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Amount of money, time, etc. that is required or used.

The total cost of the new complex was an estimated $1.5 million.

We have to cut costs if we want to avoid bankruptcy.

The average cost of a new house is twice as much as t was 20 years ago.

noun
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A negative consequence or loss that occurs or is required to occur.

There were many costs to the development project, the least of all was the financial aspect.

If you train all the time, there will be a few costs such as a lack of free time.

noun
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To incur a charge; to require payment of a price.

This shirt cost $50, while this was cheaper at only $30.

It will cost you a lot of money to take a trip around the world.

verb
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To cause something to be lost; to cause the expenditure or relinquishment of.

Trying to rescue the man from the burning building cost them their lives.

verb
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To calculate or estimate a price.

I'd cost the repair work at a few thousand.

verb
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(heraldry) A cottise.
noun
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To cause to lose, suffer, or sacrifice.

Participating in the strike cost me my job.

verb
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To require a specified payment, expenditure, effort, or loss.

It costs more to live in the city.

verb
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2
(law) The expenses of a lawsuit, esp. those assessed by the court against the losing party.
noun
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The amount of money, etc. asked or paid for a thing; price.
noun
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1
(business) To estimate the cost of making, producing, carrying out, etc.
verb
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2
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at all costs
  • Regardless of the expense or effort involved; by any means.
idiom
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at all costs
  • regardless of the cost or difficulty involved; by any means required
idiom
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1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
cost
Plural:
costs

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of cost

  • Middle English from Old French from coster to cost from Latin cōnstāre to be fixed, cost constant

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Cognate with Icelandic kostur, German dialectal Kust (“taste, flavour”), Dutch kust (“choice, choosing”), North Frisian kest (“choice, estimation, virtue”), West Frisian kêst (“article of law, statute”), Old English cyst (“free-will, choice, election, the best of anything, the choicest, picked host, moral excellence, virtue, goodness, generosity, munificence”). Related to choose.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English cost, from Old English cost (“option, choice, possibility, manner, way, condition”), from Old Norse kostr (“choice, opportunity, chance, condition, state, quality”), from Proto-Germanic *kustuz (“choice, trial”) (Proto-Germanic *kustiz (“choice, trial”)), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵéwstus (“to enjoy, taste”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English costen, from Old French coster, couster (“to cost”), from Medieval Latin costare, from Latin constare (“stand together, stand at, cost”), from com- + stare (“stand”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English cost, coust, from costen (“to cost”), see below.

    From Wiktionary