Toll meaning

tōl
A fixed charge or tax for a privilege, especially for passage across a bridge or along a road.
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Toll is defined as the charge for using a specific road or for making a telephone call, or it refers to the total loss or damage caused by an event.

When you pay $.50 cents to cross a bridge, this is an example of a toll.

When a plane crash causes 10 deaths, this is an example of a situation where the death toll is equal to ten.

When you suffer a loss and feel sad, this is an example of a situation where the loss took an emotional toll on you.

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A charge for a service, such as a telephone call to another country.
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An amount or extent of loss or destruction, as of life, health, or property.
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To exact as a toll.
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To charge a fee for using (a structure, such as a bridge).
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To sound (a large bell) slowly at regular intervals.
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To announce or summon by tolling.
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To sound in slowly repeated single tones.
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The act of tolling.
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The sound of a bell being struck.
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A tax or charge for a privilege, esp. for permission to pass over a bridge, along a highway, etc.
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A charge for service or extra service, as for transportation, for a long-distance telephone call, or, formerly, for having one's grain milled.
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The number lost, taken, exacted, etc.; exaction.

The tornado took a heavy toll of lives.

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To collect a toll or tolls.
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To take or gather as a toll.
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To impose a toll on.
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To allure or entice; esp., to decoy (game, etc.)
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To sound or ring slowly in regularly repeated strokes.
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The act of tolling a bell.
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The sound of a bell tolling.
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A single stroke of the bell.
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To bar, or take away; to defeat.
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To stop from running (said of a statutory period of time).
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To charge for the use of another’s property, hence toll roads, toll bridges, and so on.
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Loss or damage incurred through a disaster.

The war has taken its toll on the people.

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A fee paid for some liberty or privilege, particularly for the privilege of passing over a bridge or on a highway, or for that of vending goods in a fair, market, etc.
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(business) A fee for using any kind of material processing service.

We can handle on a toll basis your needs for spray drying, repackaging, crushing and grinding, and dry blending.

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(US) A tollbooth.

We will be replacing some manned tolls with high-speed device readers.

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A portion of grain taken by a miller as a compensation for grinding.
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To impose a fee for the use of.

Once more it is proposed to toll the East River bridges.

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(intransitive) To levy a toll on (someone or something).
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To take as a toll.
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To pay a toll or tallage.

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The act or sound of tolling.
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(ergative) To ring (a bell) slowly and repeatedly.

Martin tolled the great bell every day.

Ask not for whom the bell tolls.

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To summon by ringing a bell.

The ringer tolled the workers back from the fields for vespers.

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To announce by tolling.

The bells tolled the King's death.

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To tear in pieces.
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Hou many virgins shal she tolle and drawe to þe Lord - "Life of Our Lady"

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To lure with bait (especially, fish and animals).
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(law) To suspend.

The statute of limitations defense was tolled as a result of the defendant's wrongful conduct.

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Origin of toll

  • Middle English tol from Old English variant of toln from Medieval Latin tolōnīum from Latin telōnēum tollbooth from Greek telōneion from telōnēs tax collector from telos tax telə- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English tollen to ring an alarm perhaps from tollen to entice, pull variant of tillen from Old English -tyllan
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English tol, tolle, from Old English tol, toll, toln (“toll, duty, custom"), from Proto-Germanic *tullō (“what is counted or told"), from Proto-Indo-European *dol- (“calculation, fraud"). Cognate with Dutch tol (“toll"), German Zoll (“toll, duty, customs"), Danish told (“toll, duty, tariff"), Swedish tull (“toll, customs"), Icelandic tollur (“toll"), Latin dolus (“trick, deception"). More at tell, tale.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English tolen, tollen, variation of tullen, tillen (“to draw, allure, entice"), from Old English *tyllan, *tillan (“to pull, draw, attract") (found in compounds fortyllan (“to seduce, lead astray, draw away from the mark, deceive") and betyllan, betillan (“to lure, decoy")), related to Old Frisian tilla (“to lift, raise"), Dutch tillen (“to lift, raise, weigh, buy"), Low German tillen (“to lift, remove"), Swedish dialectal tille (“to take up, appropriate").
    From Wiktionary
  • Alternate etymology derives Old English toll, from Medieval Latin tolōneum, tolōnium, alteration (due to the Germanic forms above) of Latin telōneum, from Ancient Greek τελώνιον (telōnion, “toll-house"), from τέλος (telos, “tax").
    From Wiktionary
  • Probably the same as Etymology 3. Possibly related to or influenced by toil
    From Wiktionary
  • From Latin tollere
    From Wiktionary