Toil meaning

toil
Toil means continuous and hard work.

An example of toil is labor in a field for 10 hours a day.

noun
13
6
Toil is defined as to engage in difficult and continuous work.

An example of toil is to work in physical labor for 10 hours a day.

verb
5
6
To labor continuously; work strenuously.
verb
3
6
To proceed with difficulty.
verb
2
6
Exhausting labor or effort.
noun
2
6
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Strife; contention.
noun
1
0
Something that binds, snares, or entangles one; an entrapment.

Caught in the toils of despair.

noun
1
0
A net for trapping game.
noun
1
0
To work hard and continuously; labor.
verb
1
0
To proceed laboriously; advance or move with painful effort or difficulty.

To toil up a mountain.

verb
1
1
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To make or accomplish with great effort.
verb
0
0
Contention; struggle; strife.
noun
0
0
Hard, exhausting work or effort; tiring labor.
noun
0
0
A task performed by such effort.
noun
0
0
A net for trapping.
noun
0
0
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Any snare suggestive of a net.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
A net or snare; any thread, web, or string spread for taking prey; usually in the plural.
noun
0
0
(intransitive) To labour; work.
verb
0
0
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(intransitive) To struggle.
verb
0
0
To work (something); often with out.
verb
0
0
To weary through excessive labour.
verb
0
0

Origin of toil

  • Middle English toilen from Anglo-Norman toiler to stir about from Latin tudiculāre from tudicula a machine for bruising olives diminutive of tudes hammer

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French toile cloth from Old French teile from Latin tēla web teks- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English toilen, toylen, apparently a conflation of Anglo-Norman toiler (“to agitate, stir up, entangle") (compare Old Northern French toiller, touellier ("to agitate, stir"; of unknown origin)), and Middle English tilen, telien, teolien, tolen, tolien, tulien (“to till, work, labour"), from Old English tilian, telian, teolian, tiolian (“to exert oneself, toil, work, make, generate, strive after, try, endeavor, procure, obtain, gain, provide, tend, cherish, cultivate, till, plough, trade, traffic, aim at, aspire to, treat, cure") (compare Middle Dutch tuylen, teulen (“to till, work, labour")), from Proto-Germanic *tilōnÄ… (“to strive, reach for, aim for, hurry"). Cognate with Scots tulyie (“to quarrel, flite, contend").

    From Wiktionary

  • Alternate etymology derives Middle English toilen, toylen from Middle Dutch tuylen, teulen (“to work, labour, till"), from tuyl (“agriculture, labour, toil"). Cognate with Old Frisian teula (“to labour, toil"), Old Frisian teule (“labour, work"). More at till.

    From Wiktionary