Plug definition

plŭg
A small wedge or segment cut from something, as from a melon to test its ripeness.
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(geology) A mass of igneous rock filling the vent of a volcano.
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(slang) An old, worn-out horse.
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(informal) To work or study hard and steadily; plod.
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To insert in an appropriate place or position.

Plug a quarter into the parking meter; plugged the variables into the equation.

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An object, such as a cork or a wad of cloth, used to fill a hole tightly; a stopper.
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A dense mass of material that obstructs a passage.
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(informal) A favorable public mention of a commercial product, business, or performance, especially when broadcast.
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(informal) A boost, advertisement, etc., esp. one inserted gratuitously in the noncommercial parts of a radio or TV program, magazine article, etc. for someone or something.
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(slang) To have sex with, penetrate sexually.

I'd love to plug her.

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A plug is defined as the end piece of a cord for an electrical device with prongs that fit into a wall socket.

An example of a plug is what connects a laptop to a wall to recharge its battery.

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The definition of a plug is something used to fill or stop a hole or gap.

An example of a plug is a rubber sink stopper.

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A usually cylindrical or conic piece cut from something larger, often as a sample.
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A hydrant.
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(slang) Something inferior, useless, or defective, especially an old, worn-out horse.
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(slang) A gunshot or bullet.

A plug in the back.

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A fishing lure having a hook or hooks.
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A fitting, commonly with two metal prongs for insertion in a fixed socket, used to connect an appliance to a power supply.
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A spark plug.
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A flat cake of pressed or twisted tobacco.
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A piece of chewing tobacco.
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To fill (a hole) tightly with or as if with a plug; stop up.
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To insert (something) as a plug.

Plugged a cork in the bottle.

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(informal) To publicize (a product, for example) favorably, as by mentioning on a broadcast.

Authors who plug their latest books on TV talk shows.

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To hit with a bullet; shoot.
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To hit with the fist; punch.
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To become stopped up or obstructed.

A gutter that plugged up with leaves.

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(informal) To move or work doggedly and persistently.
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An object used to stop up a hole, gap, outlet, etc.
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A natural concretion or formation that stops up a passage, duct, etc.
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An electrical connector, as with projecting prongs, designed to be fitted into an outlet, etc., thus making contact or closing a circuit.
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A kind of fishing lure.
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(informal) A defective or shopworn article.
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(informal) A patch of skin containing several hair follicles, for transplanting onto a bald spot.
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(geol.) Igneous rock which has filled in the vent of a dead volcano and hardened: it is often exposed by erosion.
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A cake of pressed tobacco.
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A piece of chewing tobacco.
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To stop up or fill (a hole, gap, etc.) by inserting a plug.
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To insert a plug of (something) in a hole or gap.
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To cut a plug from (a melon) to test its ripeness.
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(slang) To shoot a bullet into.
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(slang) To hit with the fist.
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To publicize or boost (a song) by frequent performance.
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To advertise or publicize, esp. gratuitously in the noncommercial parts of a radio or TV program.
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To connect with something so as to become attached, to close an electric circuit, etc.
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A male connector with pins designed to be inserted into the sockets of a female jack in a plugand-jack connection. See also connector and jack.
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(electricity) A pronged connecting device which fits into a mating socket.

I pushed the plug back into the electrical socket and the lamp began to glow again.

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Any piece of wood, metal, or other substance used to stop or fill a hole; a stopple.

Pull the plug out of the tub so it can drain.

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(US) A flat oblong cake of pressed tobacco.

He preferred a plug of tobacco to loose chaw.

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(US, slang) A high, tapering silk hat.
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(US, slang) A worthless horse.

That sorry old plug is ready for the glue factory!

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(construction) A block of wood let into a wall to afford a hold for nails.
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A mention of a product (usually a book, film or play) in an interview, or an interview which features one or more of these.

During the interview, the author put in a plug for his latest novel.

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(geology) A body of once molten rock that hardened in a volcanic vent. Usually round or oval in shape.

Pressure built beneath the plug in the caldera, eventually resulting in a catastrophic explosion of pyroclastic shrapnel and ash.

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(fishing) A type of lure consisting of a rigid, buoyant or semi-buoyant body and one or more hooks.

The fisherman cast the plug into a likely pool, hoping to catch a whopper.

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To stop with a plug; to make tight by stopping a hole.

He attempted to plug the leaks with some caulk.

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To blatantly mention a particular product or service as if advertising it.

The main guest on the show just kept plugging his latest movie: it got so tiresome.

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(intransitive, informal) To persist or continue with something.

Keep plugging at the problem until you find a solution.

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To shoot a bullet into something with a gun.
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plug in
  • to connect (an electrical device) with an outlet, etc. by inserting a plug in a socket, jack, etc.
  • to be or become connected in this way or in a way regarded as analogous
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(informal) pull the plug
  • to disconnect a device being used to maintain a terminal patient's life
  • to put an end to something
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
plug
Plural:
plugs

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of plug

  • Dutch from Middle Dutch plugge

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • 1606; from Dutch plug, from Middle Dutch plugge 'peg, plug', from Proto-Germanic *plugjaz (cf. Low German Plüg, German Pflock 'needle', Norwegian plug 'peg, small wedge'); akin to Lithuanian plúkti 'to strike, hew'.

    From Wiktionary