Nag meaning

năg
To annoy by constant scolding, complaining, or urging.
verb
4
1
One who nags.
noun
2
1
A horse, especially:
  • An old or worn-out horse.
  • A racehorse.
noun
2
2
To annoy by continual scolding, faultfinding, complaining, urging, etc.
verb
1
0
To keep troubling, worrying, etc.

Nagged by a thought.

verb
1
0
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To urge, scold, find fault, etc. constantly.
verb
1
0
To cause continual discomfort, pain, etc.

A nagging toothache.

verb
1
0
A person, esp. a woman, who nags.
noun
1
0
A horse that is worn-out, old, etc.
noun
1
0
A racehorse, esp. an inferior one.
noun
1
0
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An old useless horse.
noun
1
0
The definition of a nag is a horse, particularly an old one or one in poor condition, or a person who constantly urges, annoys or scolds.

An example of nag is a former racehorse which has had many injuries.

An example of nag is a wife who constantly reminds her husband of the tasks he has to complete.

noun
1
1
To torment persistently, as with anxiety or pain.
verb
1
1
To scold, complain, or find fault constantly.

Nagging at the children.

verb
1
1
To be a constant source of anxiety or annoyance.

The half-remembered quotation nagged at my mind.

verb
1
1
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A small saddle horse or pony.
noun
0
0
A small saddle horse; pony.
noun
0
0
A small horse; a pony.
noun
0
0
To repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters.
verb
0
0
To act inappropriately in the eyes of peers, to backstab, to verbally abuse.
verb
0
0
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To bother with persistent memories.

The notion that he forgot something nagged him the rest of the day.

verb
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Other sorts of persistent annoyance, e.g..

A nagging pain in his left knee.

A nagging north wind.

verb
0
0
One who nags.
noun
0
0
Nag is defined as to constantly urge, annoy or scold.

An example of nag is for a parent to constantly ask their son to clean his room.

An example of nag is a constant pain.

verb
0
1

Origin of nag

  • Probably of Scandinavian origin Old Norse gnaga to bite, gnaw
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English nagge possibly of Low German origin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Probably from a North Germanic source; compare Swedish nagga (“to gnaw, grumble"), Danish nage, Icelandic nagga (“to complain").
    From Wiktionary
  • Middle English nagge, cognate with Dutch negge
    From Wiktionary