Ride meaning

rīd
To move by way of an intangible force or impetus; move as if on water.

The President rode into office on a tide of discontent.

verb
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To seem to float.

The moon was riding among the clouds.

verb
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To be contingent; depend.

The final outcome rides on the results of the election.

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To travel over a surface.

This car rides well.

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To continue without interference.

Let the matter ride.

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To keep (a vessel) at anchor.
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To continue undisturbed, with no action taken.

Let the matter ride.

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To torment, harass, or tease by making the butt of ridicule, criticism, etc.
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To lie at anchor.

Battleships riding at the mouth of the estuary.

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To work or move from the proper place, especially on the body.

Pants that ride up.

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To travel over, along, or through.

Ride the highways.

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To be supported or carried on.

A swimmer riding the waves.

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To take part in or do by riding.

He rode his last race.

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To cause to ride, especially to cause to be carried.

The police rode him down to the station.

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To control (an opponent) in wrestling, usually by holding the opponent down.
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To keep partially engaged by slightly depressing a pedal with the foot.

Don't ride the clutch or the brakes.

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The act or an instance of riding, as in a vehicle or on an animal.
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A path made for riding on horseback, especially through woodlands.
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A device, such as one at an amusement park, that one rides for pleasure or excitement.
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A means of transportation.

Waiting for her ride to come.

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To be fit for riding or admit of being ridden.

A car that rides smoothly.

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To seem to be floating in space.
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To overlap, as bones in a joint.
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To be dependent (on)

The change rides on his approval.

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To be placed as a bet (on)
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To sit on or in and control so as to move along.

To ride a horse, a bicycle, etc.

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To move over, along, or through (a road, fence, area, etc.) by horse, car, etc.
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To cover (a specified distance) by riding.
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To engage in or do by riding.

To ride a race.

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To cause to ride; carry; convey.
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To mount (a female) as for copulation.
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To control, dominate, tyrannize over, or oppress.

Ridden by doubts.

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A road, track, etc. for riding, esp. on horseback.
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A roller coaster, Ferris wheel, or other thing to ride, as at an amusement park.
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1951-2012; U.S. astronaut: 1st U.S. woman in space (1983)
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(intransitive) To transport oneself by sitting on and directing a horse, later also a bicycle etc. [from 8th c., transitive usage from 9th c.]
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(intransitive) To be transported in a vehicle; to travel as a passenger. [from 9th c., transitive usage from 19th c.]
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(chiefly US, South Africa) To transport (someone) in a vehicle. [from 17th c.]

The cab rode him downtown.

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(intransitive) Of a ship: to sail, to float on the water. [from 10th c.]
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(intransitive) To be carried or supported by something lightly and quickly; to travel in such a way, as though on horseback. [from 10th c.]

The witch cackled and rode away on her broomstick.

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(intransitive) To support a rider, as a horse; to move under the saddle.

A horse rides easy or hard, slow or fast.

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(intransitive) To mount (someone) to have sex with them; to have sexual intercourse with. [from 15th c.]
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(colloquial) To nag or criticize; to annoy (someone). [from 19th c.]
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(intransitive) Of clothing: to gradually move (up) and crease; to ruckle. [from 19th c.]
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(intransitive) To rely, depend (on). [from 20th c.]
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(intransitive) Of clothing: to rest (in a given way on a part of the body). [from 20th c.]
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(lacrosse) To play defense on the defensemen or midfielders, as an attackman.
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To manage insolently at will; to domineer over.
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To convey, as by riding; to make or do by riding.
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(surgery) To overlap (each other); said of bones or fractured fragments.
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An instance of riding.

Can I have a ride on your bike?

noun
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(informal) A vehicle.

That is a nice ride you are driving.

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An amusement ridden at a fair or amusement park.
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A lift given to someone in another person's vehicle.

Can you give me a ride?

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(UK) A road or avenue cut in a wood, for riding; a bridleway or other wide country path.
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(UK, dialect, archaic) A saddle horse.

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To ride is defined as to sit in or on something and move from one place to another.

An example of to ride is sitting on the back of an elephant and it taking you through the jungle.

An example of to ride is driving a car from your house to the store.

An example of to ride is pedaling a bicycle around your neighborhood.

verb
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To be sustained or supported on a pivot, axle, or other point.
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ride for a fall
  • To court danger or disaster.
idiom
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ride herd on
  • To keep watch or control over.
idiom
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ride high
  • To experience success.
idiom
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ride shotgun
  • To guard a person or thing while in transit.
  • To ride in the front passenger seat of a car or truck.
idiom
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take for a ride
  • To deceive or swindle:.
    An author who tried to take his publisher for a ride.
  • To transport to a place and kill.
idiom
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ride down
  • To hit and knock down by riding against.
  • To overtake by riding.
  • To overcome.
  • To exhaust (a horse, etc.) by riding too long or too hard.
idiom
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ride out
  • To stay afloat or aloft during (a storm, etc.) without too much damage.
  • To withstand or endure successfully.
idiom
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ride up
  • To move upward out of place.
idiom
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take for a ride
  • To take somewhere, as in a car, and kill.
  • To cheat or swindle.
idiom
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Origin of ride

  • Middle English riden from Old English rīdan reidh- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English riden, from Old English rÄ«dan, from Proto-Germanic *rÄ«danÄ…, from Proto-Indo-European *reydÊ°-. Cognate with Low German rieden, Dutch rijden, German reiten, Danish ride, Swedish rida; and (from Indo-European) with Welsh rhwyddhau (“hurry").
    From Wiktionary