Drive meaning

drīv
To move along or advance quickly.

We could hear the trucks driving along the highway.

verb
4
2
To work or try hard, as to reach a goal.
verb
2
0
To push, propel, or press onward forcibly; urge forward.

Drove the horses into the corral.

verb
2
2
To make an effort to reach or achieve an objective; aim.
verb
1
0
A strong organized effort to accomplish a purpose.

A drive to finish the project before the deadline.

noun
1
0
Advertisement
Energy, push, or aggressiveness.

An executive with a lot of drive.

noun
1
0
A massive, sustained military offensive.
noun
1
0
To drive is defined as to operate a vehicle, to be licensed to operate a vehicle or moving something using force.

An example of drive is when you get in your car and go to the store.

An example of drive is when you have a license allowing you to operate a car.

An example of drive is when you hit a golf ball in a certain direction.

verb
1
1
To compel or force to work, often excessively.
verb
0
0
To force into or from a particular act or state.

Indecision drives me crazy.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
The act of driving.

Took the car out for a drive after dinner.

noun
0
0
A trip or journey in a vehicle.

It's a long drive to Eau Claire from here.

noun
0
0
A road for automobiles and other vehicles.
noun
0
0
A device that reads data from and often writes data onto a storage medium, such as an optical disc or flash memory.
noun
0
0
A strong motivating tendency or instinct related to self-preservation, reproduction, or aggression that prompts activity toward a particular end.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To cause to go through; make penetrate.
verb
0
0
To control the movement or direct the course of (an automobile, horse and wagon, locomotive, etc.)
verb
0
0
To transport in an automobile or other vehicle.
verb
0
0
To carry on with vigor; push (a bargain, etc.) through.
verb
0
0
To drive through (the lane)
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To be driven; operate.
verb
0
0
To go or be conveyed in a vehicle.
verb
0
0
To operate a motor vehicle.
verb
0
0
To move quickly and aggressively, while dribbling, past defenders and to the basket.
verb
0
0
The act or an instance of driving.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A trip in a vehicle.
noun
0
0
The power or energy to get things done; enthusiastic or aggressive vigor.
noun
0
0
That which is urgent or pressing; pressure.
noun
0
0
A collection of logs being floated down a river to a sawmill.
noun
0
0
A device that communicates motion to a machine or machine part.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A unit that reads and writes data on magnetic tape, a disk, etc.
noun
0
0
Any of the basic biological impulses or urges, such as self-preservation, hunger, sex, etc.
noun
0
0
A strong motivating tendency or instinct related to self-preservation, reproduction, or aggression that prompts activity toward a particular end.
noun
0
0
To supply the motive force or power to and cause to function.
verb
0
0
(1) An electromechanical device that contains and reads and writes magnetic disks, optical discs or magnetic tapes. See magnetic disk, optical disc and magnetic tape.
0
0
Advertisement
To impel or urge onward by force; to push forward; to compel to move on.

To drive sheep out of a field.

verb
0
0
(intransitive) To direct a vehicle powered by a horse, ox or similar animal.
verb
0
0
To cause animals to flee out of.

The beaters drove the brambles, causing a great rush of rabbits and other creatures.

verb
0
0
To move (something) by hitting it with great force.

You drive nails into wood with a hammer.

verb
0
0
To cause (a mechanism) to operate.

The pistons drive the crankshaft.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
(ergative) To operate (a wheeled motorized vehicle).

Drive a car.

verb
0
0
To motivate; to provide an incentive for.

What drives a person to run a marathon?

verb
0
0
To compel (to do something).

Their debts finally drove them to sell the business.

verb
0
0
To cause to become.

This constant complaining is going to drive me to insanity. You are driving me crazy!

verb
0
0
(intransitive, cricket) To hit the ball with a drive.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(intransitive) To travel by operating a wheeled motorized vehicle.

I drive to work every day.

verb
0
0
To convey (a person, etc) in a wheeled motorized vehicle.

My wife drove me to the airport.

verb
0
0
(intransitive) To move forcefully.
verb
0
0
To urge, press, or bring to a point or state.
verb
0
0
To carry or to keep in motion; to conduct; to prosecute.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
To clear, by forcing away what is contained.
verb
0
0
(mining) To dig horizontally; to cut a horizontal gallery or tunnel.

verb
0
0

Crassus had wealth and wit, but Pompey had drive and Caesar as much again.

noun
0
0
Violent or rapid motion; a rushing onward or away; especially, a forced or hurried dispatch of business.
noun
0
0
An act of driving animals forward, to be captured, hunted etc.
noun
0
0
(military) A sustained advance in the face of the enemy to take a strategic objective.

Napoleon's drive on Moscow was as determined as it was disastrous.

noun
0
0
A motor that does not take fuel, but instead depends on a mechanism that stores potential energy for subsequent use.

Some old model trains have clockwork drives.

noun
0
0
A trip made in a motor vehicle.

It was a long drive.

noun
0
0

The mansion had a long, tree-lined drive.

noun
0
0
A type of public roadway.

Beverly Hills’ most famous street is Rodeo Drive.

noun
0
0
(dated) A place suitable or agreeable for driving; a road prepared for driving.
noun
0
0
(psychology) Desire or interest.
noun
0
0
(computing) An apparatus for reading and writing data to or from a mass storage device such as a disk, as a floppy drive.
noun
0
0
(computing) A mass storage device in which the mechanism for reading and writing data is integrated with the mechanism for storing data, as a hard drive, a flash drive.
noun
0
0
(golf) A stroke made with a driver.
noun
0
0
(baseball) A ball struck in a flat trajectory.
noun
0
0
(cricket) A type of shot played by swinging the bat in a vertical arc, through the line of the ball, and hitting it along the ground, normally between cover and midwicket.
noun
0
0
(soccer) A straight level shot or pass.
noun
0
0
A charity event such as a fundraiser, bake sale, or toy drive.
noun
0
0
(typography) An impression or matrix formed by a punch drift.
noun
0
0
A collection of objects that are driven; a mass of logs to be floated down a river.
noun
0
0
To repulse or put to flight by force or influence.

Drove the attackers away; drove out any thought of failure.

verb
0
1
To guide, control, or direct (a vehicle).
verb
0
1
To force to go through or penetrate.

Drove the stake into the ground.

verb
0
1
To create or produce by penetrating forcibly.

The nail drove a hole in the tire.

verb
0
1
To carry through vigorously to a conclusion.

Drove home his point; drive a hard bargain.

verb
0
1
To rush, dash, or advance violently against an obstruction.

The wind drove into my face.

verb
0
1
To force to go; urge onward; push forward.
verb
0
1
To force into or from a state or act.

Driven mad.

verb
0
1
To force to work, usually to excess.
verb
0
1
To make or produce by penetrating.

To drive a hole through metal.

verb
0
1
To advance violently; dash.
verb
0
1
To drive a blow, ball, missile, etc.
verb
0
1
drive at
  • To aim at.
  • To mean; intend.
idiom
0
0
drive in
  • To force in, as by a blow.
  • To cause (a runner) to score or (a run) to be scored, as by getting a hit.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of drive

  • Middle English driven from Old English drīfan dhreibh- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English driven, from Old English drīfan (“to drive, force, move, chase, hunt, follow up, pursue; impel by physical force, rush against, thrust, carry off vigorously, transact, prosecute, conduct, practice, carry on, exercise, do; speak often of a matter, bring up, agitate, trot out; urge a cause; suffer, undergo; proceed with violence, rush with violence, act impetuously”), from Proto-Germanic *drībaną (“to drive”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰreybʰ- (“to drive, push”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰer- (“cloudy, dirty, muddy”). Cognate with Scots drive (“to drive”), North Frisian driwe (“to drive”), West Frisian driuwe (“to chase, drive, impel”), Dutch drijven (“to drive”), Low German drieven (“to drive, drift, push”), German treiben (“to drive, push, propel”), Danish drive (“to drive, run, force”), Swedish driva (“to drive, power, drift, push, force”), Icelandic drífa (“to drive, hurry, rush”).
    From Wiktionary