Drag meaning

drăg
The definition of a drag is a person or thing that is being slow, pulled, moved or resistant.

An example of drag is a person not wanting to go to a party.

noun
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(baseball) To hit (a bunt) while taking the first steps toward first base.
verb
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To take part in a drag race.
verb
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To trail along the ground.

The dog's leash dragged on the sidewalk.

verb
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(slang) A street or road.

The town's main drag.

noun
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(slang) To participate in or as if in a drag race.
verb
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noun
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To search or dredge the bottom of a body of water.

Dragging for the sunken craft.

verb
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To pull or draw with force or effort, esp. along the ground; haul.
verb
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To move slowly or with effort.

He dragged along behind us.

verb
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To pass or proceed slowly, tediously, or laboriously.

The time dragged as we waited.

verb
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To draw on a cigarette, pipe, or cigar.
verb
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To mention or introduce (an unpleasant or tedious subject).

Dragged up that embarrassing incident; is always dragging his money problems into the conversation.

verb
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To prolong tediously.

Dragged the story out.

verb
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To break up, rake, or smooth out (land or dirt), especially by pulling a drag or heavy mesh.

Dragged the infield between innings.

verb
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The act of dragging, especially a slow, laborious movement.
noun
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(slang) One that is obnoxiously tiresome.

The evening was a real drag.

noun
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A puff on a cigarette, pipe, or cigar.
noun
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The clothing characteristic of one sex when worn by a member of the opposite sex.

An actor in drag.

noun
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Of, relating to, or being a person wearing clothing characteristic of the opposite sex.

A drag performer; a drag show.

adjective
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To pull a grapnel, net, etc. over the bottom of (a river, lake, etc.) in searching for something; dredge.
verb
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To draw a harrow over (land)
verb
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To draw (something) out over a period of time; protract tediously or painfully.
verb
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To bring (a subject) into conversation, a piece of writing, etc. unnecessarily or as if by force.
verb
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To hit (a ball) in executing a drag bunt.
verb
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(comput.) On a GUI screen,
  • To move (an icon), esp. by means of a mouse, in such a way that its course can be followed.
  • To relocate or process (a file, etc.) by so moving its icon.
verb
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To be dragged; be pulled along the ground or other surface; trail.
verb
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To lag behind.
verb
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To be prolonged tediously; move or pass too slowly.
verb
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To search a body of water with a grapnel, net, etc.
verb
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(slang) To draw deeply (on a cigarette, pipe, etc.)
verb
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Something dragged or pulled along the ground.
  • A harrow used for breaking ground.
  • A heavy sledge, or sled.
  • A type of private stagecoach of the 19th cent., with seats inside and on top, drawn by four horses.
noun
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A device used to catch and haul up something under water; grapnel, dragnet, etc.
noun
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A thing that checks motion, as a brake on the wheel of a carriage.
noun
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Anything that hinders or obstructs.

A drag on his resources.

noun
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The amount by which anything drags.
noun
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The act of dragging; slow, cumbersome movement.
noun
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(slang) Influence that gains special or undeserved favors; pull.
noun
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(slang) A dance.
noun
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(slang) A street; road.

The main drag.

noun
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(slang) A dull or boring person, situation, etc.
noun
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(aeron., engineering) A resisting force exerted on an aircraft, motor vehicle, etc. parallel to its airstream and opposite in direction to its motion.
noun
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A force acting on a moving body, opposite in direction to the movement of the body, caused by the interaction of the body and the medium it moves through. The strength of drag usually depends on the velocity of the body. &diamf3; Drag caused by buildup of pressure in front of the moving body and a decrease in pressure behind the body is called pressure drag . It is an important factor in the design of aerodynamically efficient shapes for cars and airplanes. &diamf3; Drag caused by the viscosity of the medium as the molecules along the body's surface move through it is called skin drag or skin friction . It is an important factor in the design of efficient surface materials for cars, airplanes, boat hulls, skis, and swimsuits.
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To move an object on screen such that its complete movement is visible from starting location to destination. The movement may be activated with a stylus, mouse or keyboard keys.To drag an object with the mouse, point to it. Press the mouse button and hold the button down while moving the mouse. When the object is at its new location, release the mouse button. See Win Drag and drop.
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To pull along a surface or through a medium, sometimes with difficulty.
verb
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(intransitive) To move slowly.

Time seems to drag when you’re waiting for a bus.

verb
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To act or proceed slowly or without enthusiasm; to be reluctant.
verb
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To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly.
verb
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To draw along (something burdensome); hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty.
verb
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To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back.
verb
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(computing) To move (an item) on the computer display by means of a mouse or other input device.

Drag the file into the window to open it.

verb
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To unintentionally rub or scrape on a surface.

The car's loose muffler was dragging on the road.

verb
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To perform as a drag queen or drag king.
verb
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(soccer) To hit or kick off target.
verb
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To fish with a dragnet.
verb
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To break (land) by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow.
verb
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(figuratively) To search exhaustively, as if with a dragnet.
verb
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(uncountable) Resistance of the air (some other fluid) to something moving through it.

When designing cars, manufacturers have to take drag into consideration.

noun
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(countable, foundry) The bottom part of a sand casting mold.
noun
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(countable) A device dragged along the bottom of a body of water in search of something, e.g. a dead body, or in fishing.
noun
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(countable, informal) A puff on a cigarette or joint.
noun
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(countable, slang) Someone or something that is annoying or frustrating; an obstacle to progress or enjoyment.

Travelling to work in the rush hour is a real drag.

noun
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(countable, slang) Someone or something that is disappointing.
noun
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(countable, slang) Horse-drawn wagon or buggy. [from mid-18th c.]

noun
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(countable, slang) Street, as in 'main drag'. [from mid-19th c.]
noun
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(countable) The scent-path left by dragging a fox, for training hounds to follow scents.

To run a drag.

noun
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(countable, snooker) A large amount of backspin on the cue ball, causing the cue ball to slow down.
noun
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A heavy harrow for breaking up ground.
noun
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A kind of sledge for conveying heavy objects; also, a kind of low car or handcart.

A stone drag.

noun
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(metallurgy) The bottom part of a flask or mould, the upper part being the cope.
noun
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(masonry) A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone.
noun
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(nautical) The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel.
noun
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Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; especially, a canvas bag with a hooped mouth (drag sail), so used.
noun
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A skid or shoe for retarding the motion of a carriage wheel.
noun
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Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged.
noun
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(uncountable, slang) Women's clothing worn by men for the purpose of entertainment. [from late 19th c.]

He performed in drag.

noun
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(uncountable, slang) Any type of clothing or costume associated with a particular occupation or subculture.

Corporate drag.

noun
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Drag is defined as to pull or move a person or thing.

An example of drag is pulling a dog who doesn't want to go anywhere by their leash.

An example of drag is highlighting a folder on a computer desktop and moving it into another folder on the desktop.

verb
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To pull along with difficulty or effort; haul.

Dragged the heavy box out of the way.

verb
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To cause to trail along a surface, especially the ground.

Don't drag your coat in the mud.

verb
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drag (one's) feet
  • To act or work with intentional slowness; delay.
idiom
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drag on
  • to prolong or be prolonged tediously
idiom
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drag one's feet
  • to act with deliberate slowness or obvious reluctance; be uncooperative
idiom
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Origin of drag

  • Middle English draggen from Old Norse draga or variant of Middle English drawen draw

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English draggen (“to drag”), early Middle English dragen (“to draw, carry”), confluence of Old English dragan (“to drag, draw, draw oneself, go, protract”) and Old Norse draga (“to draw, attract”); both from Proto-Germanic *draganą (“to draw, drag”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰerāgʰ- (“to draw, drag”). Verb sense influenced due to association with the noun drag (“that which is hauled or dragged”), related to Low German dragge (“a drag-anchor, grapnel”). Cognate with Danish drægge (“to dredge”), Danish drage (“to draw, attract”), Swedish dragga (“to drag, drag anchor, sweep”), Swedish draga (“to draw, go”), Icelandic draga (“to drag, pull”). More at draw.

    From Wiktionary