Poke definition

pōk
A sack; a bag.
noun
21
2
A poke bonnet, or its projecting front brim.
noun
10
2
To search or look curiously in a desultory manner.

Poked about in the desk.

verb
5
3
To push or jab with a stick, finger, etc.; prod.
verb
2
0
noun
2
1
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A push, thrust, or jab.
noun
1
0
Pokeweed.
noun
1
0
To intrude; meddle.
verb
1
0
To pry or search.
verb
1
0
To make (a hole or pathway, for example) by or as if by prodding, elbowing, or jabbing.

I poked my way to the front of the crowd.

verb
1
1
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One who moves slowly or aimlessly; a dawdler.
noun
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0
A projecting brim at the front of a bonnet.
noun
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0
A large bonnet having a projecting brim.
noun
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To make by poking.

To poke a hole in a bag.

verb
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To stir up (a fire) by jabbing the coals with a poker.
verb
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To thrust (something) forward; intrude.

To poke one's head out a window.

verb
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(slang) To hit with the fist.
verb
0
0
To make jabs with a stick, poker, etc. (at something)
verb
0
0
To stick out; protrude.
verb
0
0
To live or move slowly or lazily; loiter; putter; dawdle.
verb
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0
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The act of poking; jab; thrust; nudge.
noun
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(slang) A blow with the fist.
noun
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(dial.) A sack or bag.
noun
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(archaic) A pocket.
noun
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0
A wallet or purse.
noun
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0
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Money, esp. all that one has.
noun
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0
noun
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0
To prod or jab with a pointed object such as a finger or a stick. [from later 14th c.]
verb
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To poke a fire to remove ash or promote burning.
verb
0
0
(figuratively) To rummage as in to poke about in. [from early 19th c.]
verb
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0
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(computing) To modify the value stored in (a memory address).
verb
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To put a poke on.

To poke an ox.

verb
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0
To thrust with the horns; to gore.
verb
0
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(US, slang) A lazy person; a dawdler.
noun
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0
(US, slang) A stupid or uninteresting person.

noun
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0
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(computing) The storage of a value in a memory address, typically to modify the behaviour of a program or to cheat at a video game.
noun
0
0
(now regional) A sack or bag. [from early 13th c.]
noun
0
0
A long, wide sleeve; a poke sleeve.
noun
0
0
(Scotland, Northern Ireland) An ice cream cone.
noun
0
0
(dialectal) Pokeweed.
noun
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0
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To stir (a fire) by prodding the wood or coal with a poker or stick.
verb
1
2
To make thrusts or jabs, as with a stick or poker.
verb
1
2
To proceed in a slow or lazy manner; putter.

Just poked along all morning.

verb
1
2
To thrust forward; appear.

The child's head poked from under the blankets.

verb
1
2
The definition of a poke is a push or a prod.

An example of poke is the act of gently sticking a pen into a person's shoulder to get his attention.

noun
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1
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Poke is defined as to prod or push.

An example of poke is for a child to keep sticking his finger into his brother's arm.

verb
0
1
To push or jab at, as with a finger or an arm; prod.
verb
0
1
To push; thrust.

A seal poked its head out of the water.

verb
0
1
(slang) To strike; punch.
verb
0
1
To pry or meddle; intrude.

Poking into another's business.

verb
0
1
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(slang) A punch or blow with the fist.

A poke in the jaw.

noun
0
1
(US) A device to prevent an animal from leaping or breaking through fences, consisting of a yoke with a pole inserted, pointed forward.
noun
0
1
poke fun at
  • To ridicule in a mischievous manner.
idiom
0
0
poke fun at
  • to ridicule or deride, esp. satirically or slyly
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
poke
Plural:
pokes

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

poke fun at
poke fun at

Origin of poke

  • Short for dialectal pocan of Virginia Algonquian origin akin to puccoon

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English poken probably from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English probably from Old North French pocket

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From poke

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps from Middle Dutch poken or German poken (both from Proto-Germanic *puk-), perhaps imitative.

    From Wiktionary

  • Either a shortening of, or from the same source as, pocan (“pokeweed") (quod vide).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Anglo-Norman poke, whence pocket

    From Wiktionary