Pole meaning

pōl
Either of the regions contiguous to the extremities of the earth's rotational axis, the North Pole or the South Pole.
noun
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Either of two antithetical ideas, propensities, forces, or positions.
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To use ski poles to maintain or gain speed.
verb
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The definition of a pole is either end of a dividing line through a sphere, or the opposing ends of two forces.

An example of a pole is Antarctica.

An example of a pole is the negative terminal on a car battery.

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To push along (a boat or raft) with a pole.
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The region around the North Pole or that around the South Pole.
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Either of two opposed or differentiated forces, parts, or principles, such as the ends of a magnet, the terminals of a battery, motor, or dynamo, or two extremes of opinion.
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Either of the two differentiated regions in the early embryo of many animals; specif., the animal pole containing little yolk and the vegetal pole containing most of the yolk.
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A point or points with characteristic properties, as the point of origin of polar coordinates.
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A person born or living in Poland.
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1500-58; Eng. cardinal: last Rom. Catholic archbishop of Canterbury (1556-58)
proper name
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Either extremity of an axis through a sphere.
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Either of two oppositely charged terminals, as in an electric cell or battery.
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A magnetic pole.
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Either of two oppositely charged terminals, such as the two electrodes of an electrolytic cell or the electric terminals of a battery.
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A long, slender, tapering shaft of wood, metal, or concrete with a round cross-section that is planted in the ground and stands vertically, and to which cables, antennas, transformers, and other devices can be secured for support of applications including telecommunications and television transmission, and electrical power distribution and transmission.
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Either of two points at which opposing or differentiated forces are concentrated, such as the ends of a magnet or the terminals of a battery, motor, or dynamo.
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Originally, a stick; now specifically, a long and slender piece of metal or (especially) wood, used for various construction or support purposes.
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(fishing) A type of basic fishing rod.
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A long fiberglass sports implement used for pole-vaulting.
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(slang, spotting) A telescope used to identify birds, aeroplanes or wildlife.
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(historical) A unit of length, equal to a perch (¼ chain or 5½ yards).
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(auto racing) Pole position.
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To propel by pushing with poles, to push with a pole.

Huck Finn poled that raft southward down the Mississippi because going northward against the current was too much work.

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To identify something quite precisely using a telescope.

He poled off the serial of the Gulfstream to confirm its identity.

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To furnish with poles for support.

To pole beans or hops.

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To convey on poles.

To pole hay into a barn.

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To stir, as molten glass, with a pole.
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Either of the two points on the earth's surface around which it rotates; also, similar points on any other rotating object.
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A point of magnetic focus, especially each of the two opposing such points of a magnet (designated north and south).
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(geometry) A fixed point relative to other points or lines.
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(electricity) A contact on an electrical device (such as a battery) at which electric current enters or leaves.
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(complex analysis) For a meromorphic function : a point for which as .

The function has a single pole at .

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To induce piezoelectricity in (a substance) by aligning the dipoles.
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A person from Poland or of Polish descent.
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A pole is defined as a long piece of wood, metal or other material.

An example of a pole is what a United States flag hangs from in front of a fire department.

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Either extremity of an axis through a sphere.
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Either of two oppositely charged terminals, as in an electric cell or battery.
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A fixed point of reference.
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A long, relatively slender, generally rounded piece of wood or other material.
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The long tapering wooden shaft extending up from the front axle of a vehicle to the collars of the animals drawing it; a tongue.
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The inside position on the starting line of a racetrack.

Qualified in the time trials to start on the pole.

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To support (plants) with a pole.
verb
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To strike, poke, or stir with a pole.
verb
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To propel a boat or raft with a pole.
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A native or inhabitant of Poland.
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A person of Polish ancestry.
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A long, slender piece of wood, metal, etc., usually rounded.

A tent pole, flagpole, fishing pole.

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A tapering wooden shaft extending from the front axle of a wagon or carriage and attached by chains or straps to the collars of a span of horses.
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A unit of measure, equal to one rod in linear measure (5.029 m) or one square rod in square measure (25.29 sq m)
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An assigned starting position at a racetrack, in the front row if there is more than one row and in the innermost lane.
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To manipulate, impel, support, etc. with or as with a pole.
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Either end of any axis, as of the earth, of the celestial sphere, or of a mitotic spindle during cell division.
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Pole means a person from or living in Poland.

An example of Pole is someone born in Warsaw.

noun
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under bare poles
  • With all sails furled because of high winds.
idiom
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poles apart
  • Widely separated; having opposite natures, opinions, etc.; at opposite extremes.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

under bare poles

Origin of pole

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin polus from Greek polos axis, sky kwel-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English pāl from Latin pālus stake pag- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English pole, pal, from Old English pāl (“a pole, stake, post; a kind of hoe or spade"), from Proto-Germanic *palaz, *pālaz (“pole"), from Latin pālus (“stake, pale, prop, stay") from Old Latin *paglus, from Proto-Indo-European *pāǵe- (“to nail, fasten"). Cognate with Scots pale, paill (“stake, pale"), North Frisian pul, pil (“stake, pale"), West Frisian poal (“pole"), Dutch paal (“pole"), German Pfahl (“pile, stake, post, pole"), Danish pæl (“pole"), Swedish pÃ¥le (“pole"), Icelandic páll (“hoe, spade, pale"), Old English fæc (“space of time, while, division, interval; lustrum").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle French pole, pôle, and its source, Latin polus, from Ancient Greek πόλος (polos, “axis of rotation").

    From Wiktionary

  • From German Pole.

    From Wiktionary