Pale definition

pāl
A narrow, upright, pointed stake used in fences; picket.
noun
11
5
A territory or district enclosed within bounds.
noun
5
2
(intransitive) To become insignificant.

2006 New York Times Its financing pales next to the tens of billions that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation will have at its disposal...

verb
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To make pale.
verb
5
5
A fence; enclosure; boundary; restriction.

Outside the pale of the law, beyond the pale (of respectability)

noun
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Whitish in complexion; pallid.
adjective
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3
(heraldry) A vertical band forming the middle third of a shield.
noun
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affix
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noun
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1
To pale is to lose the color from your face.

An example of pale is when you see a ghost and the fright makes you lose color in your face so it appears white and afraid.

verb
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The definition of pale is someone or something light in color or washed out.

An example of pale is your face when you are sick and the color goes from your cheeks.

An example of pale is a yellow that is not bright or vibrant.

adjective
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(heraldry) A wide vertical band in the center of an escutcheon.
noun
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A region or district lying within an imposed boundary or constituting a separate jurisdiction.
noun
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The medieval dominions of the English in Ireland. Used with the.
noun
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Feeble; weak.

A pale rendition of the aria.

adjective
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Of a low intensity of color; light.
adjective
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Having high lightness and low saturation.
adjective
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I have pale yellow wallpaper.

She had pale skin because she didn't get much sunlight.

adjective
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(of human skin) Having a pallor (a light color, especially due to sickness, shock, fright etc.).

His face turned pale after hearing about his mother's death.

adjective
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(intransitive) To turn pale; to lose colour.
verb
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To make pale; to diminish the brightness of.
verb
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(obsolete) Paleness; pallor.

noun
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A wooden stake; a picket.
noun
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(archaic) Fence made from wooden stake; palisade.
noun
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(by extension) Limits, bounds (especially before of).
noun
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The bounds of morality, good behaviour or judgment in civilized company, in the phrase beyond the pale.
noun
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(heraldry) A vertical band down the middle of a shield.
noun
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(archaic) A territory or defensive area within a specific boundary or under a given jurisdiction.
  • (historical) The parts of Ireland under English jurisdiction.
  • (historical) The territory around Calais under English control (from the 14th to 16th centuries).
  • (historical) A portion of Russia in which Jews were permitted to live.
noun
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(archaic) The jurisdiction (territorial or otherwise) of an authority.
noun
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A shore for bracing a timber before it is fastened.

noun
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To enclose with pales, or as if with pales; to encircle or encompass; to fence off.

[Your isle, which stands] ribbed and paled in / With rocks unscalable and roaring waters. "” Shakespeare.

verb
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(bot.) A chaffy bract or scale; esp., a bract at the base of a floret of a composite flower.
noun
2
3
The area enclosed by a fence or boundary.
noun
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2
To enclose with pales; fence in.
verb
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2
To cause to turn pale.
verb
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2
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To become pale; blanch.

Paled with fright.

verb
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To decrease in relative importance.
verb
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Of a whitish or colorless complexion; pallid; wan.
adjective
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Lacking intensity or brilliance.
adjective
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Feeble; weak.

A pale imitation.

adjective
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2
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A fence enclosing an area.
noun
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3
Of a low intensity of light; dim or faint.
adjective
1
3
To become pale.
verb
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To seem weaker or less important.
verb
1
3
A stake or pointed stick; a picket.
noun
1
4
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beyond the pale
  • Irrevocably unacceptable or unreasonable:
    Behavior that was quite beyond the pale.
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
pale
Plural:
pales

Adjective

Base Form:
pale
Comparative:
paler
Superlative:
palest

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of pale

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin pallidus from pallēre to be pale pel-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French pal from Latin pālus pag- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old French pale, from Latin pallidus (“pale, pallid").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Latin pālus (“stake, prop").

    From Wiktionary