Pal meaning

păl
Pal is defined as to be a friend.

An example of pal is to spend time having fun with a friend.

verb
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To associate as friends or chums. Often used with around.
verb
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Palestine.
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The definition of a pal is a close friend.

An example of a pal is someone's best friend.

noun
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A friend; a chum.
noun
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Phase alternation (or alternating) line.
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(colloquial) A friend, buddy, mate, cobber, someone to hang around with.
noun
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A television standard established in Western Germany,The Netherlands, and the United Kingdom in 1967. PAL addresses problems of uneven color reproduction that affect the NTSC standard due to phase errors associated with electromagnetic signal propagation. PAL inverts the color signal by 180
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A language of Papua New Guinea.
pronoun
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Archaic form of paleo-.
prefix
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Palestinian.
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An intimate friend; comrade; chum.
noun
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To associate as pals.
verb
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To be a pal (with another)
verb
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(1) (Programmable Array Logic) A type of programmable logic chip (PLD) that contains arrays of programmable AND gates and predefined OR gates. PALs are defined by their number of inputs and outputs; for example, a 22v10 chip means 22 inputs and 10 outputs. The inputs are connected by fuses to logic circuits, which themselves are connected by fuses to the output lines. Often used for glue logic, the chips are programmed by blowing apart the required fuses in a device similar to a PROM programmer. See PLD, glue logic and PROM programmer.
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Be friends with, hang around with.

John plans to pal around with Joe today.

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Origin of pal

  • Romani phral, phal from Sanskrit bhrātā bhrātr- brother bhrāter- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Angloromani phal, from Romani phral, from Sanskrit भ्रातृ (bhrātá¹›), from Proto-Indo-European *bÊ°réhâ‚‚tÄ“r. Cognates also include English brother, Ancient Greek φράτηρ (phratÄ“r), Latin frater.

    From Wiktionary