Chum meaning

chŭm
Chum is defined as a good friend.

An example of a chum is a friend you enjoy going out to lunch with.

noun
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The definition of chum is cut up pieces of fish scattered into the water when fishing for larger fish.

An example of chum is ground sardines tossed into the water when fishing for bass.

noun
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An intimate friend or companion.
noun
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To share the same room, as in a dormitory.
verb
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To chum means to go around with a good friend, or to throw cut up fish into the water to attract other fish.

A example of chum is for two close friends to spend the day together, they chum around together.

An example of chum is to throw oily fish into the ocean to attract fish you want to catch.

verb
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Bait usually consisting of oily fish ground up and scattered on the water.
noun
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To scatter such bait in order to lure fish.
verb
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To lure (fish) with such bait.
verb
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A chum salmon.
noun
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(archaic) A roommate.
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A close friend.
noun
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(archaic) To share the same room.
verb
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To go about together, as close friends do.

To chum around.

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Fish blood, fish guts, etc. scattered in the water as to attract game fish.
noun
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To use chum to attract fish.
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noun
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A friend; a pal.

I ran into an old chum from school the other day.

noun
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(dated) A roommate, especially in a college or university.
noun
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To share rooms with; to live together.
verb
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To make friends with; to socialize.
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(Scotland, informal) To accompany.

I'll chum you down to the shops.

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(fishing) A mixture of (frequently rancid) fish parts and blood, dumped into the water to attract predator fish, such as sharks.
noun
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(fishing) To cast chum into the water to attract fish.
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Origin of chum

  • Perhaps short for chamber fellow roommate

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • 1675–85; of uncertain origin, possibly from cham, shortening of chambermate, or from comrade.

    From Wiktionary

  • Perhaps from Powhatan.

    From Wiktionary