Bud meaning

bŭd
Bud means to put forth tiny swellings such as new branches, leaves or flowers.

An example of bud is for a tree to show its first signs of flowering in the spring.

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noun
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To reproduce asexually by forming a bud.
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An earbud.
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One that is not yet fully developed.

The bud of a new idea.

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To put forth or produce buds.

A plant that buds in early spring.

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A small rounded outgrowth on an asexually reproducing organism, such as a yeast or hydra, that is capable of developing into a new individual.
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The definition of a bud is a small swelling that is underdeveloped or not yet fully developed, or is a slang word for a friend.

An example of a bud is a tiny flower that has not yet opened or reached maturity.

An example of a bud is a best friend.

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To develop or grow from or as if from a bud.
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To be in an undeveloped stage or condition.
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To cause to put forth buds.
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Any undeveloped or immature person or thing.
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An asexually produced swelling or growth on the body of a sponge, fungus, etc. that develops into a new individual.
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To put forth buds.
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To begin to develop.
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To put forth as a bud or buds.
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To cause to bud.
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To insert (a bud of a plant) into the bark of another plant.
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To put forth or produce buds.

A plant that buds in early spring.

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To reproduce asexually by forming a bud.
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A small swelling on a branch or stem, containing an undeveloped shoot, leaf, or flower. Some species have mixed buds containing two of these structures, or even all three. &diamf3; Terminal buds occur at the end of a stem, twig, or branch. &diamf3; Axillary buds, also known as lateral buds , occur in the axils of leaves (in the upper angle of where the leaf grows from the stem). &diamf3; Accessory buds often occur clustered around terminal buds or above and on either side of axillary buds. Accessory buds are usually smaller than terminal and axillary buds.
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A tiny part or structure, such as a taste bud, that is shaped like a plant bud.
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To form or produce a bud or buds.
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A newly formed leaf or flower that has not yet unfolded.

After a long, cold winter, the trees finally began to produce buds.

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(slang) Potent cannabis taken from the flowering part of the plant (the bud), or marijuana generally.

Hey bro, want to smoke some bud?

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A small rounded body in the process of splitting from an organism, which may grow into a genetically identical new organism.

In this slide, you can see a yeast cell forming buds.

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A weaned calf in its first year, so called because the horns are then beginning to bud.
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To reproduce by splitting off buds.

Yeast reproduces by budding.

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To begin to grow, or to issue from a stock in the manner of a bud, as a horn.
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To be like a bud in respect to youth and freshness, or growth and promise.

A budding virgin.

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(informal) Buddy, friend.

I like to hang out with my buds on Saturday night.

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(informal) Used to address a male.
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A male nickname.

I remember many visits from my uncle Bud.

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(rare, chiefly US) A male given name.
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(informal) A nickname for the beer Budweiser.

I'd like a Bud, please.

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To graft a bud onto (a plant).
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Friend; chum. Used as a form of familiar address, especially for a man or boy.

Move along, bud.

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To be young, promising, etc.
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To form buds.

The trees are finally starting to bud.

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in (the) bud
  • in the time of budding
  • in a budding condition
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nip in the bud
  • to put an end to at the earliest stage
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

in (the) bud

Origin of bud

  • Middle English budde

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Short for buddy

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English budde 'bud, seedpod', from Proto-Germanic *buddōn (compare Dutch bot 'bud', German Hagebutte ‘hip, rosehip', Butzen 'seedpod', Swedish dialect bodd 'head'), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew-, *bu- (“to swell”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From buddy.

    From Wiktionary

  • From bud.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Budweiser.

    From Wiktionary