Eye meaning

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The definition of an eye is the organ that gives sight in humans and animals, or the iris.

An example of an eye is the pair of visible organs that humans use to see.

noun
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The ability to make intellectual or aesthetic judgments.

Has a good eye for understated fashion.

noun
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To eye is defined as to look at or observe.

An example of to eye is to check out a jacket in a department store window, you eye the jacket.

verb
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An organ of vision or of light sensitivity.
noun
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Something suggestive of the vertebrate organ of vision, especially:
  • An opening in a needle.
  • The aperture of a camera.
  • A loop, as of metal, rope, or thread.
  • A circular marking on a peacock's feather.
  • (chiefly southern us) The round flat cover over the hole on the top of a wood-burning stove.
noun
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A choice center cut of meat, as of beef.

Eye of the round.

noun
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To look at.

Eyed the passing crowd with indifference.

verb
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To watch closely.

Eyed the shark's movements.

verb
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To supply with an eye.
verb
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The organ of sight in humans and animals.
noun
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The area around the eye, including the eyelids.

To get a black eye.

noun
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The power of seeing; sight; vision.

Weak eyes.

noun
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A look; glance; gaze.

To cast an eye on something.

noun
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Attention; regard; observation.
noun
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The power of judging, estimating, discriminating, etc. by eyesight.

A good eye for distances.

noun
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Judgment; opinion; estimation.

In the eyes of the law.

noun
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A thing like an eye in appearance or function.
  • A bud of a tuber, as a potato.
  • The spot on a peacock's tail feather.
  • The center of a flower; disk.
  • A hole in a tool, as for a handle.
  • The threading hole in a needle.
  • A loop of metal, rope, or thread.
    Hook and eye.
  • An organ sensitive to light, as in certain lower forms of life.
  • A section of any of certain cuts of meat.
    eye of round.
  • A hole, as in certain cheeses.
noun
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(slang, former) A private detective; private eye.
noun
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(meteorol.) The calm, low-pressure area at the center of a strong tropical cyclone, hurricane, or typhoon, around which winds of high velocity move.
noun
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(naut.) The part of the main deck of a vessel that is farthest forward.
noun
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To look at; watch carefully; observe.
verb
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To provide with eyes, or holes.
verb
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(obs.) To appear (to the eyes)
verb
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An organ of vision or of light sensitivity.
noun
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Either of a pair of hollow structures located in bony sockets of the skull, functioning together or independently, each having a lens capable of focusing incident light on an internal photosensitive retina from which nerve impulses are sent to the brain; the vertebrate organ of vision.
noun
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The external, visible portion of this organ together with its associated structures, especially the eyelids, eyelashes, and eyebrows.
noun
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The pigmented iris of this organ.
noun
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(anatomy) The vertebrate organ of sight, composed of a pair of fluid-filled spherical structures that occupy the orbits of the skull. Incoming light is refracted by the cornea of the eye and transmitted through the pupil to the lens, which focuses the image onto the retina.
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(zoology) An organ in invertebrates that is sensitive to light.
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(botany) A bud on a tuber, such as a potato.
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(meteorology) The relatively calm area at the center of a hurricane or similar storm.
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An organ through which animals see.

Bright lights really hurt my eyes.

noun
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The visual sense.

The car was quite pleasing to the eye, but impractical.

noun
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Attention, notice.

That dress caught her eye.

noun
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The ability to notice what others might miss.

He has an eye for talent.

noun
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A meaningful stare or look.

She was giving him the eye at the bar. When the car cut her off, she gave him the eye.

noun
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A private eye: a privately hired detective or investigator.
noun
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A hole at the blunt end of a needle through which thread is passed.
noun
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A fitting consisting of a loop of metal or other material, suitable for receiving a hook or the passage of a cord or line.
noun
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The relatively clear and calm center of a hurricane or other such storm.
noun
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A mark on an animal, such as a peacock or butterfly, resembling a human eye.
noun
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The dark spot on a black-eyed pea.
noun
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noun
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(informal) The dark brown center of a black-eyed Susan flower.
noun
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A loop forming part of anything, or a hole through anything, to receive a rope, hook, pin, shaft, etc. — e.g. at the end of a tie bar in a bridge truss; through a crank; at the end of a rope; or through a millstone.
noun
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That which resembles the eye in relative importance or beauty.
noun
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Tinge; shade of colour.
noun
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(An organ that is sensitive to light, by which means animals see): ocellus.
hyponyms
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To observe carefully.

After eyeing the document for an hour she decided not to sign it.

They went out and eyed the new car one last time before deciding.

verb
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To view something narrowly, as a document or a phrase in a document.
verb
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To look at someone or something as if with the intent to do something with that person or thing.
verb
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An eye of pheasants.

noun
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(UK, colloquial) The comedic magazine Private Eye.
pronoun
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(UK) The London Eye, a tourist attraction in London.
pronoun
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The faculty of seeing; vision.
noun
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A photosensitive device, such as a photoelectric cell.
noun
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(informal) A detective, especially a private investigator.
noun
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all eyes
  • Fully attentive.
idiom
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an eye for an eye
  • Punishment in which an offender suffers what the victim has suffered.
idiom
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clap
  • To look at.
idiom
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eye to eye
  • In agreement:
    We're eye to eye on all the vital issues.
idiom
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have eyes for
  • To be interested in.
idiom
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have (one's) eye on
  • To look at, especially attentively or continuously.
  • To have as one's objective.
idiom
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(nautical) in the eye of the wind
  • In a direction opposite that of the wind; close to the wind.
idiom
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in the public eye
  • Frequently seen in public or in the media.
  • Widely publicized; well-known.
idiom
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(slang) my eye
  • In no way; not at all. Used interjectionally.
idiom
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with an eye to
  • With a view to:
    Redecorated the room with an eye to its future use as a nursery.
idiom
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with (one's) eyes closed
  • Unaware of the risks involved.
idiom
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with (one's) eyes open
  • Aware of the risks involved.
idiom
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all eyes
  • extremely attentive
idiom
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an eye for an eye
  • punishment or retaliation similar or equivalent to the injury suffered
idiom
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catch someone's eye
  • to attract someone's attention
idiom
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eyes right (or left)
  • a command to snap the head to the right (or left) while marching, as a salute when passing in review
idiom
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give someone the eye
  • to look at someone, esp. in an admiring or inviting way
idiom
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have an eye for
  • to have a keen appreciation of
idiom
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have an eye to
  • to watch out for; attend to
idiom
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have eyes for
  • to be very interested in and want
idiom
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in a pig's eye!
  • never; under no circumstances
idiom
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in the eye of the wind
  • directly against the wind
idiom
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in the public eye
  • much seen in public
  • often brought to public attention; well-known
idiom
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keep an eye on
  • to look after; watch carefully
idiom
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keep an eye out for
  • to be watchful for
idiom
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keep one's eyes open
  • to be on the lookout; be watchful
idiom
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lay eyes on
  • to see; look at
idiom
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look someone in the eye
  • to look directly and assertively into the eyes of another
    Out of shame he couldn't look me in the eye.
idiom
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make eyes at
  • to look at amorously or flirtatiously
idiom
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my eye!
  • an exclamation of contradiction, skepticism, etc.
idiom
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open someone's eyes
  • to make someone aware of the facts, real reasons, etc.
idiom
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run one's eye over
  • to glance at hurriedly
idiom
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see eye to eye
  • to agree completely
idiom
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see with half an eye
  • to see or understand (something) easily because it is so evident
idiom
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shut one's eyes to
  • to refuse to see or think about
idiom
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turn a blind eye to
  • to ignore or pretend not to notice (something)
idiom
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with an eye to
  • paying attention to; considering
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of eye

  • Middle English from Old English ēge, ēage okw- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old English ēaġe (“eye”), from Proto-Germanic *augô (“eye”) (compare Scots ee, West Frisian each, Dutch oog, German Auge, Swedish öga), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃okʷ-, *h₃ekʷ- (“eye; to see”) (compare Latin oculus, Lithuanian akìs, Old Church Slavonic око (oko), Albanian sy, Ancient Greek ὤψ (ōps, “eye, face”), Armenian ակն (akn), Avestan [script?] (aši, “eyes”), Sanskrit अक्षि (ákṣi), Tocharian A ak). Related to ogle.

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably from a nye changing to an eye.

    From Wiktionary