Orb meaning

ôrb
One of a series of concentric transparent spheres thought by ancient and medieval astronomers to revolve about the earth and carry the celestial bodies.
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A globe surmounted by a cross, used as a symbol of monarchial power and justice.
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Something of circular form; a circle or orbit.
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A sphere or spherical object.
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An eye or eyeball.
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To move in an orbit.
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The sphere of influence of a planet, star, or house.
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To move in an orbit.
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To shape into a circle or sphere.
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To encircle; enclose.
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A sphere, or globe.
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The eye or eyeball.
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A small globe with a cross on top, as a symbol of royal power.
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A collective body; organized whole.
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Anything circular in form; circle.
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To form into a sphere or circle.
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To enclose or encircle.
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To take on the shape of an orb.
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A sphere or spherical object.
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An eye or eyeball.
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(Object Request Broker) Software that handles the communication of messages from the requesting program (client) to the object as well as any return values from the object back to the calling program. See CORBA and DCOM. See also ORB disk.
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A spherical body; a globe; especially, one of the celestial spheres; a sun, planet, or star.

In the small orb of one particular tear. --Shakespeare.

Whether the prime orb, Incredible how swift, had thither rolled. -- John Milton.

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One of the azure transparent spheres conceived by the ancients to be inclosed one within another, and to carry the heavenly bodies in their revolutions.
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A circle; especially, a circle, or nearly circular orbit, described by the revolution of a heavenly body; an orbit.

The schoolmen were like astronomers, which did feign eccentrics, and epicycles, and such engines of orbs. --Bacon.

You seem to me as Dian in her orb. --Shakespeare.

In orbs Of circuit inexpressible they stood, Orb within orb. --John Milton.

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(rare) A period of time marked off by the revolution of a heavenly body. --John Milton.
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(poetic) The eye, as luminous and spherical.

A drop serene hath quenched their orbs. --John Milton.

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(poetic) A revolving circular body; a wheel.

The orbs Of his fierce chariot rolled. --John Milton.

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(rare) A sphere of action. --William Wordsworth.

But in our orbs we'll live so round and safe. --Shakespeare.

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A globus cruciger.
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A translucent sphere appearing in flash photography.
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(military) A body of soldiers drawn up in a circle, as for defence, especially infantry to repel cavalry.
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(poetic) To form into an orb or circle.

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(poetic) To encircle; to surround; to enclose.
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(poetic, intransitive) To become round like an orb.
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(architecture) A blank window or panel.

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(software engineering) Initialism of Object Request Broker.
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Origin of orb

  • Middle English orbe orbit from Old French from Latin orbis circle, disk, orbit orbh- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • French orbe, from Latin orbis (“circle, orb"). Compare orbit.
    From Wiktionary
  • Old French orb (“blind"), from Latin orbus (“destitute").
    From Wiktionary