Circuit meaning

sûrkĭt
Frequency:
The definition of a circuit is a closed path or a line forming a boundary.

An example of circuit is the wires made up of conductors and other components that allow for electricity to travel on wires.

An example of circuit is the path taken by a judge who officates at several courts.

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To make a circuit or circuit of.
verb
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The line or the length of the line forming the boundaries of an area.
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The area bounded.
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The act of going around something; course or journey around.

The moon's circuit of the earth.

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The judicial district of a U.S. Court of Appeals.
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To go in a circuit.
verb
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To make a circuit about.
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A closed path through which an electric current flows or may flow. &diamf3; Circuits in which a power source is connected to two or more components (such as light bulbs, or logic gates in a computer circuit), one after the other, are called series circuits. If the circuit is broken, none of the components receives a current. Circuits in which a power source is directly connected to two or more components are called parallel circuits. If a break occurs in the circuit, only the component along whose path the break occurs stops receiving a current.
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A system of electrically connected parts or devices.
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(1) A set of electronic components that perform a particular function in an electronic system. See hardware circuit.
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Historically, a judicial district wherein a judge would travel from town to town to preside over hearings.
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A judicial district established in some states wherein one or more courts have jurisdiction to hear cases.
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One of the twelve judicial districts (along with a special nationwide thirteenth circuit) in which the United States is divided for the appellate review of federal trials by a United States Court of Appeals.
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A closed loop comprising a number of elements such as resistors, capacitors, transistors, and power sources connected together for the purpose of carrying an electrical current.
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An end-to-end communications path between a transmitter and a receiver. Circuit generally implies a logical connection, or session, over a physical medium. Circuit often is used interchangeably with path, link, line, and channel, although the usage can be specific to the underlying technology, the overall context, and other factors. Circuits can be characterized in many ways. For example, a circuit can be either two-wire or fourwire in nature, for either access or transport applications. A circuit can be simplex, half-duplex, or fullduplex in nature. A circuit can be dedicated, switched, or virtual in nature. A circuit sometimes is referred to in the vernacular as a pipe, as in a broadband pipe. See also channel, four-wire circuit, line, link, path, twowire circuit, and virtual circuit.
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The act of moving or revolving around, or as in a circle or orbit; a revolution; as, the periodical circuit of the earth around the sun.
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The circumference of, or distance around, any space; the measure of a line around an area.
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That which encircles anything, as a ring or crown.
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The space enclosed within a circle, or within limits.
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(electricity) Enclosed path of an electric current, usually designed for a certain function.
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A regular or appointed journeying from place to place in the exercise of one's calling, as of a judge, or a preacher.
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(law) A certain division of a state or country, established by law for a judge or judges to visit, for the administration of justice.
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(law) Abbreviation of circuit court.
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(Methodist Church) A district in which an itinerant preacher labors.
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By analogy to the proceeding three, a set of theaters among which the same acts circulate; especially common in the heyday of vaudeville.
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(intransitive, obsolete) To move in a circle; to go round; to circulate.

verb
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(obsolete) To travel around.

Having circuited the air.

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Origin of circuit

  • Middle English circumference from Old French from Latin circuitus a going around from past participle of circumīre to go around circum- circum- īre to go ei- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English circuit, from Old French circuit, from Latin circuitus (“a going round”), from circuire (“go round”), from circum (“around”) + ire

    From Wiktionary