Planet meaning

plăn'ĭt
The definition of a planet is a large mass that revolves around a star, such as one of the celestial bodies moving around the sun.

The Earth is an example of a planet.

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(astronomy) A body which orbits the Sun directly and is massive enough to be in hydrostatic equilibrium (effectively meaning a spheroid) and to dominate its orbit; specifically, the eight major bodies of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. (Pluto was considered a planet until 2006 and has now been reclassified as a dwarf planet.) [from 17th c.]
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A large body which directly orbits any star (star cluster) but which has not attained nuclear fusion.
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In phrases such as the planet, this planet, sometimes refers to the Earth.
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One of the seven celestial bodies, Mercury, Venus, the moon, the sun, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn, visible to the naked eye and thought by ancient astronomers to revolve in the heavens about a fixed Earth and among fixed stars.
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One of the seven revolving astrological celestial bodies that in conjunction with the stars are believed to influence human affairs and personalities.
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Any of the celestial objects with apparent motion (as distinguished from the apparently still stars), including the sun, moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, or Saturn.
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Now, a large, opaque, nonluminous mass, usually with its own moons, that revolves about a star; esp., one of the sun's eight major planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune: until recently, Pluto had been classified as the ninth major planet.
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Any of the celestial bodies regarded as influencing human lives: traditionally, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, and the sun and moon.
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In the traditional model of solar systems, a celestial body larger than an asteroid or comet, illuminated by light from a star, such as the Sun, around which it revolves.
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A celestial body that orbits the Sun, has sufficient mass to assume nearly a round shape, clears out dust and debris from the neighborhood around its orbit, and is not a satellite of another planet. The eight planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Pluto was considered to be a planet until its reclassification in 2006 as a dwarf planet. A planetlike body with more than about ten times the mass of Jupiter would be considered a brown dwarf rather than a planet.
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(now historical or astrology) Each of the seven major bodies which move relative to the fixed stars in the night sky"”the Moon, Mercury, Venus, the Sun, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. [from 14th c.]
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Origin of planet

  • Middle English from Old French planete from Late Latin planēta from Greek planētēs variant of planēs planēt- from planāsthai to wander pelə-2 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English planete, from Old English planÄ“ta (“planet, chasuble"), from Latin planeta, planetes, from Ancient Greek πλανήτης (planÄ“tÄ“s) variant of πλάνης (planÄ“s, “wanderer, planet"), from Ancient Greek πλανάω (planáō, “wander about, stray"), of unknown origin. Perhaps from a Proto-Indo-European *pel- (“to wander, roam"), cognate with Latin pālor (“wander about, stray"), Old Norse flana (“to rush about"), Norwegian flanta (“to wander about"). More at flaunt.
    From Wiktionary