World meaning

wûrld
A particular way of life.

The world of the homeless.

noun
6
1
A realm or domain.

The animal world; the world of imagination.

noun
4
0
A large amount; much.

Did her a world of good; candidates that are worlds apart on foreign policy.

noun
4
0
All that relates to or affects the life of a person.

He saw his world collapse about him.

noun
3
0
The world is the planet and all the people on it, or describes the things that are important to a person.

An example of the world is planet earth.

An example of the world is all of the people who live on Earth.

An example of the world is your family.

noun
3
2
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Of or relating to the world.

A world champion.

adjective
1
0
A specified part of the earth.

The Western World.

noun
0
0
A part of the earth and its inhabitants as known at a given period in history.

The ancient world.

noun
0
0
Secular life and its concerns.

A man of the world.

noun
0
0
Involving or extending throughout the entire world.

A world crisis.

adjective
0
0
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The earth and its inhabitants.
noun
0
0
Individual experience, outlook, etc.

A man whose world is narrow.

noun
0
0
A large amount; great deal.

The rest did him a world (or worlds) of good.

noun
0
0
A star or planet.
noun
0
0
(with “the") Human collective existence; existence in general.

There will always be lovers, till the world's end.

noun
0
0
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noun
0
0
(uncountable, with “the") The Earth.

People are dying of starvation all over the world.

noun
0
0
(countable) A planet, especially one which is inhabited or inhabitable.

Our mission is to travel the galaxy and find new worlds.

noun
0
0
An individual or group perspective or social setting.

In the world of boxing, good diet is all-important.

noun
0
0
(informal) A great amount.

A world of difference; a world of trouble; a world of embarrassment.

noun
0
0
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To consider or cause to be considered from a global perspective; to consider as a global whole, rather than making or focussing on national or other distinctions; compare globalise.
verb
0
0
To make real; to make worldly.
verb
0
0
A celestial body such as a planet.

The possibility of life on other worlds.

noun
0
1
for all the world
  • In all respects; precisely:.
    She looked for all the world like a movie star.
idiom
0
0
in the world
  • Used as an intensive:.
    How in the world did they manage? I never in the world would have guessed.
idiom
0
0
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out of this world
  • Extraordinary; superb:.
    The dinner was out of this world.
idiom
0
0
the world over
  • Throughout the world:.
    Known the world over.
idiom
0
0
world without end
  • Forever.
idiom
0
0
bring into the world
  • To give birth to.
  • To assist in the delivery of (a child).
idiom
0
0
come into the world
  • To be born.
idiom
0
0
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for all the world
  • For any reason or consideration at all.
  • In every respect; exactly.
idiom
0
0
in the world
  • On earth or in the universe; anywhere.
    Where in the world could you find this?.
  • At all; ever.
    How in the world did you know?.
idiom
0
0
on top of the world
  • Elated with joy, pride, success, etc.; exultant.
idiom
0
0
out of this world
  • Exceptionally fine; extraordinary.
idiom
0
0
world without end
  • Forever.
idiom
0
0
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Origin of world

  • Middle English from Old English weorold wī-ro- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English world, weoreld, from Old English world, worold, woruld, weorold (“world, age, men, humanity, life, way of life, long period of time, cycle, eternity"), from Proto-Germanic *weraldiz (“lifetime, worldly existence, mankind, age of man, world"), equivalent to wer (“man") +"Ž eld (“age"). Cognate with Scots warld (“world"), West Frisian wrâld (“world"), Dutch wereld (“world"), Low German Werld (“world"), German Welt (“world"), Swedish värld (“world"), Icelandic veröld (“the world").
    From Wiktionary