Sight meaning

sīt
Sight is the ability to see, the act of seeing or something seen.

An example of sight is being able to see well in the darkness.

An example of a sight is a view of the Grand Canyon.

noun
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3
Sight is defined as to see, notice or observe.

An example of to sight is to see land after sailing for a week.

verb
6
3
Mental view; opinion; judgment.

A hero in our sight.

noun
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To take aim.

Sighted along the barrel of the gun.

verb
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The act of seeing; perception by the eyes.
noun
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A view; look; glimpse.
noun
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Any of various devices used to aid the eyes in lining up a gun, optical instrument, etc. on its objective.
noun
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Aim or an observation taken with mechanical aid, as on a sextant or gun.
noun
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The faculty or power of seeing; vision; eyesight.
noun
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Range or field of vision.
noun
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Any person or thing of a strikingly unpleasant or unusual appearance.
noun
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A large amount; great deal.

A sight better than fighting.

noun
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noun
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To observe or examine by taking a sight.
verb
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To catch sight of; see.
verb
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To bring into the sights of a rifle, etc.; aim at.
verb
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To aim (a gun, etc.) using the sights.
verb
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To take aim or an observation with a sight.
verb
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To look carefully in a specified direction.

Sight along the line.

verb
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Read, done, understood, etc. quickly and easily as soon as seen.
adjective
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Due or payable when presented.

A sight draft.

adjective
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(in the singular) The ability to see.
noun
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The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view.

To gain sight of land.

noun
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Something seen.
noun
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Something worth seeing; a spectacle.

You really look a sight in that silly costume!

noun
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A device used in aiming a projectile, through which the person aiming looks at the intended target.
noun
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A small aperture through which objects are to be seen, and by which their direction is settled or ascertained.

The sight of a quadrant.

noun
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(now colloquial) A great deal, a lot; frequently used to intensify a comparative.

A sight of money.

This is a darn sight better than what I'm used to at home!

noun
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In a drawing, picture, etc., that part of the surface, as of paper or canvas, which is within the frame or the border or margin. In a frame, the open space, the opening.
noun
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Mental view; opinion; judgment.

In their sight it was harmless.

noun
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To register visually.
verb
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To get sight of (something).

To sight land from a ship.

verb
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To apply sights to; to adjust the sights of; also, to give the proper elevation and direction to by means of a sight.

To sight a rifle or a cannon.

verb
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To take aim at.
verb
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The foreseeable future; prospect.

No solution in sight.

noun
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1
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Mental perception or consideration.

We lost sight of the purpose of our visit.

noun
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To perceive with the eyes; get sight of.

Sighted land after 40 days at sea.

verb
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To observe through a sight or an optical instrument.

Sight a target.

verb
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To adjust the sights of (a rifle, for example).
verb
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To take aim with (a firearm).
verb
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To direct one's gaze; look carefully.
verb
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Mental vision or perception.
noun
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a sight
  • A lot; much:.
    We're a sight better off without him.
idiom
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on sight
  • Immediately upon being seen:.
    Threatened to shoot looters on sight.
idiom
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out of sight
  • Remarkable; incredible:.
    The graduation party was out of sight.
idiom
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sight for sore eyes
  • One whom it is a relief or joy to see.
idiom
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sight unseen
  • Without seeing the object in question:.
    Bought the horse sight unseen.
idiom
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a sight for sore eyes
  • A person or thing that is pleasant to see; welcome sight.
idiom
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at first sight
  • When seen or considered for the first time.
idiom
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at sight
  • When or as soon as seen.
  • Upon demand or presentation.
idiom
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by sight
  • By appearance; by recognizing but not through being acquainted.
idiom
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catch sight of
  • To make out by means of the eyes; discern; see.
  • To see briefly; glimpse.
idiom
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lose sight of
  • To fail to keep in sight; see no longer.
  • To fail to keep in mind; forget.
idiom
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not by a long sight
  • Not nearly.
  • Not at all.
idiom
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out of sight
  • Not in sight.
  • Far off; remote.
  • Beyond reach; unattainable; extremely high, as in standards, price, etc.
  • Excellent; wonderful.
idiom
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out of sight of
  • Not in sight of.
  • Not close or near to; remote from.
idiom
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set one's sights on
  • To aim to achieve or attain.
    To set your sights on a college diploma.
idiom
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sight unseen
  • Without seeing (the thing mentioned) beforehand.
idiom
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0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of sight

  • Middle English from Old English sihth, gesiht something seen sekw-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old English sihþ (“something seen").

    From Wiktionary