Show meaning

shō
Show is defined as to bring into view, teach, or display.

An example of show is bringing a present from behind your back to give to someone.

An example of show is teaching someone how to use Microsoft Word.

An example of show is displaying your prize orchids at the state fair.

verb
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The definition of a show is a demonstration, display, or performance.

An example of a show is a someone presenting how a new kitchen gadget works.

An example of a show is a display of an artist's work in a gallery.

An example of a show is a concert.

noun
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1
To direct one's attention to; point out.

Showed them the city's historical sites.

verb
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Show describes something related to a performance.

An example of show is a ticket that admits you into a Broadway performance; a show ticket.

adjective
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To grant; bestow.

Showed no mercy to the traitors.

verb
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To open (a house, apartment, etc.) to prospective buyers or renters.
verb
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To guide; conduct.

To show a guest to a room.

verb
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To conduct; guide.

Showed them to the table.

verb
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To be or become visible or evident.

Concern showed in his face.

verb
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(slang) To make an appearance; show up.

Didn't show for her appointment.

verb
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(sports) To finish third or better in a horserace or dog race.
verb
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A display; a manifestation.

Made a show of strength.

noun
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A false appearance; a pretense.

Only a show of kindness.

noun
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Display or outward appearance.

This antique tea service is just for show. His smile was for show.

noun
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(informal) An affair or undertaking.

Ran the whole show.

noun
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(sports) Third place at the finish, as in a horserace.
noun
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To bring or put in sight or view; cause or allow to appear or be seen; make visible; exhibit; display.
verb
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To direct to another's attention; point out.

To show the sights to visitors.

verb
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To reveal, manifest, or make evident (an emotion, condition, quality, etc.) by behavior or outward sign.
verb
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To exhibit or manifest (oneself or itself) in a given character, condition, etc.

To show oneself to be reliable.

verb
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To make evident by logical procedure; explain or prove.

To show that something is right.

verb
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To make clear by going through a procedure; demonstrate.

To show how to tie a bowknot.

verb
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To register; indicate.

A clock shows the time.

verb
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To grant or bestow (favor, kindness, mercy, etc.)
verb
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(law) To allege; plead.

To show cause.

verb
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To be or become seen or visible; appear.
verb
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To have a given appearance; appear.

To show to good effect.

verb
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To finish third or better in a horse race or dog race.
verb
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(informal) To come or arrive as expected; make an appearance.
verb
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(theater) To give a performance; appear.
verb
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A showing, demonstration, or manifestation.

A show of passion.

noun
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A display or appearance, specif. a colorful or striking one.
noun
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Spectacular, pompous display; ostentation.
noun
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An indication of the presence of metal, coal, oil, etc. in the earth; trace.
noun
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Something false or superficial; semblance; pretense.

Sorrow that was mere show.

noun
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A person or thing looked upon as peculiar, ridiculous, laughable, etc.; spectacle; sight.
noun
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A public display or exhibition centered around a particular activity or industry.

A trade show.

noun
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A presentation of entertainment, as a theatrical production, TV program, film, etc.
noun
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Third position at the finish of a horse race or dog race.
noun
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(informal) Any undertaking, matter, or affair.
noun
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Of or having to do with a show, specif. a Broadway or Hollywood musical.

A medley of show tunes.

adjective
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To display, to have somebody see (something).

The car's dull finish showed years of neglect.

All he had to show for four years of attendance at college was a framed piece of paper.

verb
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To bestow; to confer.

To show mercy; to show favour.

verb
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To indicate (a fact) to be true; to demonstrate.
verb
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To guide or escort.

Could you please show him on his way. He has overstayed his welcome.

verb
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(intransitive) To be visible, to be seen.

Your bald patch is starting to show.

verb
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(intransitive, informal) To put in an appearance; show up.

We waited for an hour, but they never showed.

verb
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(intransitive, informal) To have an enlarged belly and thus be recognizable as pregnant.
verb
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(intransitive, racing) To finish third, especially of horses or dogs.

In the third race: Aces Up won, paying eight dollars; Blarney Stone placed, paying three dollars; and Cinnamon showed, paying five dollars.

verb
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(countable) A play, dance, or other entertainment.
noun
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(countable) An exhibition of items.

Art show; dog show.

noun
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(countable) A demonstration.

Show of force.

noun
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(countable) A broadcast program/programme.

Radio show; television show.

noun
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(countable) A movie.

Let's catch a show.

noun
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(uncountable) Mere display or pomp with no substance.

The dog sounds ferocious but it's all show.

noun
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A project or presentation.

Let's get on with the show. Let's get this show on the road. They went on an international road show to sell the shares to investors. It was Apple's usual dog and pony show.

noun
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(baseball, with “the”) The major leagues.

He played AA ball for years, but never made it to the show.

noun
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He through the midst unmarked, / In show plebeian angel militant / Of lowest order, passed.

noun
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(medicine) A discharge, from the vagina, of mucus streaked with blood, occurring a short time before labor.
noun
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(slang) get the show on the road
  • To get started.
idiom
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show (one's) hand
  • To display one's cards with faces up.
  • To state one's intentions or reveal one's resources, especially when previously hidden.
idiom
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show (one's) heels
  • To depart from quickly; flee.
idiom
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show (someone) a good time
  • To occupy (someone) with amusing things; entertain.
idiom
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for show
  • in order to attract notice or attention
idiom
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get the show on the road
  • to set things in operation; start an activity, venture, etc.
idiom
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good show!
  • an exclamation of appreciation and congratulations on another's accomplishment
idiom
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show someone in (or out)
  • to usher someone into (or out of) a given place
idiom
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show off
  • to make a display of; exhibit in a showy manner
  • to behave in a manner intended to attract attention
idiom
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show up
  • to bring or come to light; expose or be exposed, as faults
  • to be clearly seen; stand out
  • to come; arrive; make an appearance
idiom
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show someone up
  • to behave in a way that deliberately calls attention to the failure or shortcoming of (a rival, opponent, etc.)
idiom
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stand a show
  • to have a chance, esp. a remote one
idiom
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steal the show
  • to become the main focus of attention, plaudits, etc., esp. if in a subordinate role or position
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

show (one's) heels
show (someone) a good time
show someone in (<i>or</i> out)
show someone up
stand a show

Origin of show

  • Middle English sheuen, shouen from Old English scēawian to look at, display

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English schewen, schawen, scheawen, from Old English scēawian (“to look, look at, observe, gaze, behold, see, look on with favor, look favorably on, regard, have respect for, look at with care, consider, inspect, examine, scrutinize, reconnoiter, look out, look for, seek for, select, choose, provide, show (favor, respect, etc.), exhibit, display, grant, decree”), from Proto-Germanic *skauwōną, *skawwōną (“to look, see”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ḱou-, *(s)ḱeu- (“to heed, look, feel, take note of”); see haw, caveo, caution. Cognate with Scots shaw (“to show”), Eastern Frisian scoe (“to look, behold”), Dutch schouwen (“to inspect, view”), German schauen (“to see, behold”), Danish skue (“to behold”), Icelandic skygna (“to spy, behold, see”). Related to sheen.

    From Wiktionary