Veneer meaning

və-nîr'
A thin surface layer, as of finely grained wood, glued to a base of inferior material.
noun
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To conceal, as something common or crude, with a deceptively attractive outward show.
verb
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Veneer is a thin surface of higher quality wood placed over a lower quality wood, layers of wood glued together or a fake appearance.

An example of a veneer is a very thin layer of oak placed over a particle board shelf to make it appear to be oak.

An example of a veneer is wood or wood products glued together to make plywood.

An example of veneer is an appearance of something that is not real.

noun
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Any of the thin layers glued together to make plywood.
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A decorative facing, as of brick.
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A deceptive, superficial show; a façade.

A veneer of friendliness.

noun
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To overlay (a surface) with a thin layer of a fine or decorative material.
verb
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To glue together (layers of wood) to make plywood.
verb
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To cover with a thin layer of more costly material; esp., to cover (wood) with wood of finer quality.
verb
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To give a superficially attractive appearance to.
verb
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A thin surface layer of fine wood or costly material laid over a base of common material.
noun
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Any of the thin layers glued together to form plywood.
noun
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Any attractive but superficial appearance or display.

A veneer of culture.

noun
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A thin decorative covering of fine wood applied to coarser wood or other material.
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An attractive appearance that covers or disguises true nature or feelings.
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(woodworking) To apply veneer.

To veneer a piece of furniture with mahogany.

verb
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(figuratively) To disguise with apparent goodness.
verb
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Origin of veneer

  • Alteration of obsolete faneering from German Furnierung from furnieren to furnish, veneer from French fournir to furnish from Old French furnir of Germanic origin per1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From German Furnier, from furnieren (“to inlay, cover with a veneer"), from French fournir (“to furnish, accomplish"), from Middle French fornir, from Old French fornir, furnir (“to furnish"), from Old Frankish *frumjan (“to provide"), from Proto-Germanic *frumjanÄ… (“to further, promote"). Cognate with Old High German frumjan, frummen (“to accomplish, execute, provide"), Old English fremian (“to promote, perform"). More at furnish.
    From Wiktionary