Pretense definition

prētĕns, prĭ-tĕns
Frequency:
Something imagined or pretended.
noun
8
1
A false appearance or action intended to deceive.
noun
4
0
A false show of something.
noun
3
0
The definition of a pretense is a false impression, a false claim or an attempt to make a falsehood appear true.

An example of a pretense is when you pretend to be friends with someone you don't like.

An example of a pretense is when you claim to be an expert in something you aren't.

noun
2
1
Pretentiousness; ostentation.
noun
4
4
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A claim or assertion to a right, especially a false one.
noun
0
0
A professed but feigned reason or excuse; a pretext.

Left the room under the pretense of having to make a phone call.

noun
0
0
The quality or state of being pretentious; ostentation.

So modest as to be free from any hint of pretense.

noun
0
0
A false or studied show; an affectation.

Models making a pretense of nonchalance.

noun
0
0
A false claim or profession.
noun
0
0
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A pretending, as at play; make-believe.
noun
0
0
(rare) Aim; intention.
noun
0
0
A pretentious act or remark.
noun
0
0
(US) A false or hypocritical profession, as, under pretense of friendliness.
noun
0
0
Intention or purpose not real but professed.

Without pretense of accuracy.

noun
0
0
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An unsupported claim made or implied.
noun
0
0
An insincere attempt to reach a specific condition or quality.
noun
0
0
A claim, esp. an unsupported one, as to some distinction or accomplishment; pretension.
noun
0
1
A false reason or plea; pretext.
noun
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
pretense
Plural:
pretenses

Origin of pretense

  • Middle English from Old French pretensse from Medieval Latin praetēnsa from Late Latin feminine of praetēnsus alteration of Latin praetentus past participle of praetendere to pretend, assert pretend

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French pretensse, from Late Latin prætensus, past participle of prætendere (“to pretend"), from præ- (“before") + tendere (“to stretch"); see pretend.

    From Wiktionary