Profess meaning

prə-fĕs', prō-
To profess is to declare something, often out loud.

An example of to profess is to tell someone you’ve loved them for many years.

An example of to profess is tell a group that you’ve found religion.

verb
4
0
To affirm openly; declare or claim.
verb
1
0
To make a pretense of; pretend.
verb
1
0
To practice as a profession or claim knowledge of.

Profess medicine.

verb
1
0
To affirm belief in.

Profess Catholicism.

verb
1
0
Advertisement
To make a claim (to be something), to lay claim to (a given quality, feeling etc.), often with connotations of insincerity. [from 16th c.]
verb
1
0
To receive into a religious order or congregation.
verb
0
0
To make an open affirmation.
verb
0
0
To take the vows of a religious order or congregation.
verb
0
0
To make an open declaration of; affirm.

To profess one's love.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
To claim to have (some feeling, an interest, knowledge, etc.)
verb
0
0
To practice as one's profession.
verb
0
0
To declare one's belief in.

To profess Christianity.

verb
0
0
To accept into a religious order.
verb
0
0
To make profession, or affirmation.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To make one's profession.
verb
0
0
To administer the vows of a religious order to (someone); to admit to a religious order. (Chiefly in passive.) [from 14th c.]
verb
0
0
(reflexive) To declare oneself (to be something). [from 16th c.]
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To declare; to assert, affirm. [from 16th c.]
verb
0
0
To declare one's adherence to (a religion, deity, principle etc.). [from 16th c.]
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To work as a professor of; to teach. [from 16th c.]
verb
0
0
(now rare) To claim to have knowledge or understanding of (a given area of interest, subject matter). [from 16th c.]
verb
0
0

Origin of profess

  • Middle English professen to take vows from Old French profes that has taken a religious vow (from Medieval Latin professus avowed) and from Medieval Latin professāre to administer a vow both from Latin professus past participle of profitērī to affirm openly pro- forth pro–1 fatērī to acknowledge bhā-2 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Anglo-Norman professer, and its source, the participle stem of Latin profitÄ“rÄ«, from pro- + fatÄ“rÄ« (“to confess, acknowledge").
    From Wiktionary