Agnostic meaning

ăg-nŏstĭk
Frequency:
Agnostic means a person who views the existence of ultimate truth as unknowable, particularly when it comes to the existence of God.

Charles Darwin is an example of a famous agnostic.

noun
7
5
The definition of agnostic is believing that ultimate truth, particularly in terms of the existence of God, is unknowable.

Charles Darwin is an example of an agnostic person.

adjective
5
2
Doubtful or noncommittal.
adjective
4
0
One who is doubtful or noncommittal about something.
noun
3
0
Relating to or being an agnostic.
adjective
3
0
Advertisement
A person who believes that the human mind cannot know whether there is a God or an ultimate cause, or anything beyond material phenomena.
noun
3
2
A person who holds to a form of agnosticism, especially uncertainty of the existence of a deity.
noun
2
0
(computers) Operable or functioning using any operating system or other digital technology. Often used in combination.

Software that is platform agnostic.

adjective
2
1
Of or characteristic of an agnostic or agnosticism.
adjective
1
0
Of or relating to agnosticism or its adherents.

His agnostic viewpoint is summarized in his book.

adjective
1
0
Advertisement
Doubtful or uncertain about the existence or demonstrability of God or other deity.

She left the church when she became agnostic.

adjective
1
0
(computing) A software component (other entity) that is unaware or noncommittal regarding the specific nature of the components with which it interacts; polymorphic; modular; pluggable.

The socket communications layer is agnostic with regard to its underlying transport mechanism -- it is “transport-agnostic”.

adjective
0
0
(usually with a prepositional phrase) Having no firmly held opinions on an issue or matter of uncertainty.

I'm agnostic on whether ethanol is a green fuel.

He says he's agnostic concerning the Secretary's claims.

adjective
0
0
Not committed to a particular view, concept, method, etc.; neutral.

Agnostic on nuclear energy.

adjective
0
1

Origin of agnostic

  • a– Gnostic

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • First attested in 1870; coined by Thomas Huxley. Either from Ancient Greek ἄγνωστος (agnōstos, “ignorant, not knowing”) or from a- + Gnostic. Deriving (either way) from Ancient Greek ἀ- (a-, “not”) + γιγνώσκω (gignōskō, “I know”).

    From Wiktionary