Affect meaning

ə-fĕkt
The definition of affect means to produce a change in something.

An example of affect is severe weather conditions drowning a vast number of crops on a farm.

verb
12
3
(obsolete) A disposition, feeling, or tendency.
noun
7
3
To have an influence on or effect a change in.

Inflation affects the buying power of the dollar.

verb
7
6
To act on the emotions of; touch or move.
verb
6
3
To attack or infect, as a disease.

Rheumatic fever can affect the heart.

verb
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3
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Feeling or emotion, especially as manifested by facial expression or body language.
noun
1
0
To put on a false show of; simulate.

Affected a British accent.

verb
1
0
To move or stir the emotions of.

His death affected us deeply.

verb
1
0
To make a pretense of being, having, feeling, liking, etc.; feign.

To affect indifference.

verb
1
0
To influence or alter.
  • Macaulay.
    The climate affected their health and spirits.

The experience affected me deeply.

The heat of the sunlight affected the speed of the chemical reaction.

verb
1
0
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To tend to by nature; tend to assume.

A substance that affects crystalline form.

verb
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0
To imitate; copy.
verb
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0
To have an effect on; influence; produce a change in.

Bright light affects the eyes.

verb
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0
(obs.) A disposition or tendency.
noun
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0
To like to have, use, wear, be in, etc.

She affects plaid coats.

verb
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0
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(archaic) To aim at; seek.
verb
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0
To attack or infect, as a disease.

Rheumatic fever can affect the heart.

verb
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0
Feeling or emotion, especially as manifested by facial expression or body language.
noun
0
0
To move to emotion.

He was deeply affected by the tragic ending of the play.

verb
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0
Of an illness or condition, to infect or harm (a part of the body).

Hepatitis affects the liver.

verb
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(archaic) To dispose or incline.
verb
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0
(archaic) To tend to by affinity or disposition.
verb
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0
(archaic) To assign; to appoint.
verb
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0
(now rare) To feel affection for (someone); to like, be fond of. [from 16th c.]
verb
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0
Hazlitt.

Do not affect the society of your inferiors in rank, nor court that of the great.

verb
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To make a show of; to put on a pretence of; to feign; to assume. To make a false display of. [from 16th c.]

To affect ignorance.

He managed to affect a smile despite feeling quite miserable.

verb
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0
(psychology) A subjective feeling experienced in response to a thought or other stimulus; mood, emotion, especially as demonstrated in external physical signs. [from 19th c.]
noun
0
0

Origin of affect

  • Middle English affecten from Latin affectāre to strive after frequentative of afficere affect- to affect, influence affect1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English affecten from Latin afficere affect- to do to, act on ad- ad- facere to do dhē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman affecter (“strive after”), Middle French affecter (“feign”), and their source, Latin affectāre (“to strive after, aim to do, pursue, imitate with dissimulation, feign”), frequentative of afficere (“to act upon, influence”) (see Etymology 1, above).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle French affecter, French affecter, and its source, the participle stem of Latin afficere (“to act upon, influence, affect, attack with disease”), from ad- + facere (“to make, do”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English affect, from Latin affectus, adfectus (“a state of mind or body produced by some (external) influence, especially sympathy or love”), from afficere (“to act upon, influence”)

    From Wiktionary