Seize meaning

sēz
To seize is to take something eagerly, aggressively or by force.

An example of seize is when you jump at a chance to go to the beach on a sunny day.

An example of seize is when the police raid the home of a drug dealer and take his drugs.

verb
7
1
To take quick advantage of (an opportunity, etc.)
verb
4
2
To attack or afflict suddenly or severely.

Seized with a fit of sneezing.

verb
1
0
To have a seizure, often, specif., an epileptic seizure.
verb
1
0
To exhibit signs of seizure activity, often with convulsions.
verb
1
1
Advertisement
To grasp suddenly and forcibly; take or grab.

Seize a sword.

verb
0
0
To cause (someone) to be in possession of something.
verb
0
0
To bind (a rope) to another, or to a spar, with turns of small line.
verb
0
0
To lay sudden or forcible hold of something.
verb
0
0
To take forcibly and quickly; grab.

To seize power.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
To take hold of suddenly or forcibly, with or as with the hand; clutch.
verb
0
0
To bind (large ropes) together with cords, small lines, etc.
verb
0
0
To stick or jam, esp. because of excessive heat or friction.
verb
0
0
To exhibit signs of seizure activity, often with convulsions.
verb
0
0
To deliberately take hold of; to grab or capture.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To take advantage of (an opportunity or circumstance)
verb
0
0
To take possession of (by force, law etc.)

To seize smuggled goods.

To seize a ship after libeling.

verb
0
0
To have a sudden and powerful effect upon.

A panic seized the crowd.

A fever seized him.

verb
0
0
(nautical) To bind, lash or make fast, with several turns of small rope, cord, or small line.

To seize two fish-hooks back to back.

To seize or stop one rope on to another.

verb
0
0
(intransitive) To lay hold in seizure, by hands or claws (+ on or upon)

To seize on the neck of a horse.

The text which had seized upon his heart with such comfort and strength abode upon him for more than a year. (Southey, Bunyan, p. 21)

verb
0
0
Advertisement
(intransitive) To have a seizure.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To bind or lock in position immovably; see also seize up.

Rust caused the engine to seize, never to run again.

verb
0
0
seize on
  • To take hold of suddenly and forcibly.
  • To take possession of.
  • To turn eagerly to (an idea, etc.).
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of seize

  • Middle English seisen from Old French seisir to take possession of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Earlier seise, from Middle English seisen, sesen, saisen, from Old French seisir (“to take possession of; invest (person, court)"), from Medieval Latin sacÄ«re (“to lay claim to, appropriate") (8th century) in the phrase ad propriam sacire, from Old Low Frankish *sakjan (“to sue, bring legal action"), from Proto-Germanic *sakjanÄ…, *sakōnÄ… (compare Old English sacian (“to strive, brawl")), from Proto-Germanic *sakanÄ… (compare Old Saxon sakan (“to accuse"), Old High German sahhan (“to bicker, quarrel, rebuke"), Old English sacan 'to quarrel, claim by law, accuse'). See sake.

    From Wiktionary