Liberate meaning

lĭbə-rāt
To set free, as from oppression, confinement, or foreign control.
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To release from slavery, oppression, enemy occupation, etc.
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(slang) To steal or loot, esp. from a defeated enemy in wartime.
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(chemistry) To release (a gas, for example) from combination.
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(slang) To obtain by illegal or stealthy action.

Tried to sell appliances that were liberated during the riot.

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(Liberate Technologies, San Mateo, CA) A software company that specialized in the information appliance field. Formerly Network Computer, Inc. (NCI), a spin-off from Oracle in 1996, it changed its name in 1999. The company initially promoted the NC Reference Profile specification, later turned over to The Open Group. Liberate provided client and server software for satellite, cable, telco, ISP and corporations to deliver thin computing services. In 2005 the company declared bankruptcy and sold its North American assets to Cox Communications and Comcast Corporation. See network computer.
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To free; to release from restraint or bondage; to set at liberty; to manumit; to disengage.

To liberate a slave or prisoner.

To liberate the mind from prejudice.

To liberate gases.

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The definition of liberate is to free or emancipate someone or something, or to steal something.

When you free a prisoner, this is an example of a time when you liberate the prisoner.

When you free someone from slavery or from being held by the enemy, this is an example of a time when you liberate him.

When you steal an item from its owner, this is an example of a time when you liberate the item.

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(chem.) To free from combination in a compound.
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(euphemistic) To steal or abscond with (something).

The neighbor's garden gnome is so ugly, I'm tempted to liberate it for them.

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Origin of liberate

  • Latin līberāre līberāt- from līber free leudh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin liberatus, past participle of liberare (“to set free, deliver"), from liber (“free"); see liberal.

    From Wiktionary