Rescue meaning

rĕs'kyo͝o
Rescue is defined as to free, save from danger or take out of legal custody by force.

An example of rescue is to take in a stray dog wandering the streets.

verb
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Rescue is an act of saving, freeing or taking from legal custody by force.

An example of a rescue is saving a group of people from a sinking ship.

noun
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To cause to be free from danger, imprisonment, or difficulty; save.
verb
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To remove (a person or property) from legal custody by force, in violation of the law.
verb
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An act of rescuing; a deliverance.
noun
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The criminal offense of removing a person or property.
noun
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The dog proved a rescue with some behavior issues.

noun
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A city in California (zip code 95672)
pronoun
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To free or save from danger, imprisonment, evil, etc.
verb
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To take (a person or thing) out of legal custody by force.
verb
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The act or an instance of rescuing; deliverance.
noun
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Designating or of an animal, esp. a dog or cat, that has been adopted as a pet from a pound, animal shelter, etc.
adjective
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The aiding of someone who is in immediate and serious peril; the unlawful release (usually by force) of a person who is legally imprisoned or under arrest.
noun
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To save from any violence, danger or evil.

The well-trained team rescued everyone after the avalanche.

verb
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To free or liberate from confinement or other physical restraint.

To rescue a prisoner from the enemy.

verb
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To recover forcibly.
verb
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To deliver by arms, notably from a siege.
verb
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(figuratively) To remove or withdraw from a state of exposure to evil and sin.

Traditionally missionaries aim to rescue many ignorant heathen souls.

verb
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An act or episode of rescuing, saving.
noun
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A liberation, freeing.
noun
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The forcible ending of a siege; liberation from similar military peril.

The rescue of Jerusalem was the original motive of the Crusaders.

noun
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A special airliner flight to bring home passengers who are stranded.
noun
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Origin of rescue

  • Middle English rescouen from Old French rescourre re- re- escourre to shake (from Latin excutere) (ex- ex-) (quatere to shake kwēt- in Indo-European roots)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English rescopuen, from Old French rescoure, rescurre, rescorre; from Latin prefix re- (“re-") + excuto (“to shake or drive out"), from ex (“out") + quato (“I shake").
    From Wiktionary