Siege meaning

sēj
The surrounding and blockading of a city, town, or fortress by an army attempting to capture it.
noun
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3
The definition of a siege is a military or police operation when an area is surrounded to get people to surrender, or a long period of bad luck or misfortune.

An example of a siege is when the police surround a building occupied with armed robbers and try to get the robbers to surrender.

An example of a siege is a long string of illnesses.

noun
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3
A long, distressing or wearying period.

A siege of illness.

noun
8
5
(obsolete) A seat, especially a throne.
noun
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3
The encirclement of a fortified place by an opposing armed force intending to take it, usually by blockade and bombardment.
noun
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1
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Any persistent attempt to gain control, overcome opposition, etc.
noun
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1
To subject to a siege; besiege.

The invaders sieged the castle.

verb
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(obs.) A seat; throne.
noun
4
2
A prolonged period, as of illness.

A siege of asthma.

noun
3
3
The seat of a heron while looking out for prey; a flock of heron.
noun
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Military action.
noun
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verb
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1
1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.vii.

To th'vpper part, where was aduaunced hye / A stately siege of soueraigne maiestye; / And thereon sat a woman gorgeous gay [...].

noun
1
1
To assault a blockade of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by force or attrition; to besiege.
verb
1
1
lay siege to
  • to subject to a siege; attempt to win, gain, overcome, etc.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

lay siege to

Origin of siege

  • Middle English sege from Old French seat from Vulgar Latin sedicum from sedicāre to sit from Latin sedēre sed- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English sege, from Old French sege, siege, seige (modern French siège), from Vulgar Latin *sedicum, ultimately from Latin sēdēs (“seat”).

    From Wiktionary