City meaning

sĭtē
Frequency:
The definition of a city is a town of significant size or an urban area with self-government.

An example of a city is Manhattan.

noun
18
5
The financial and commercial center of London. Used with the.
noun
12
5
An ancient Greek city-state.
noun
5
2
A center of population, commerce, and culture; a town of significant size and importance.
noun
4
3
Used in combination as an intensive.

The playing field was mud city after the big rain.

noun
3
2
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In the U.S., an incorporated municipality whose boundaries and powers of self-government are defined by a charter from the state in which it is located.
noun
1
0
In Canada, any of various large urban municipalities within a province.
noun
1
0
All of the people of a city.
noun
1
0
In Great Britain, a borough or town with a royal charter, usually a town that has been or is an episcopal see.
noun
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0
In ancient Greece, a city-state.
noun
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0
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Of, in, for, or characteristic of a city.
adjective
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A large settlement, bigger than a town.

São Paulo is one of the largest cities in South America.

noun
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(Australia) The central business district; downtown.

I'm going into the city today to do some shopping.

noun
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(UK) A popular shortened form of the City of London, the historic core of London where the Roman settlement of Londinium was established.
pronoun
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(UK) A metonym for the United Kingdom's financial industries, which are principally based in the City of London.
pronoun
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A popular name (not always capitalized) for any of several other cities in metropolitan areas (such as San Francisco).
pronoun
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(soccer) A nickname for Manchester City Football Club, an English football club.

City will reportedly look to have a fee for Aguero.

pronoun
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0
The inhabitants of a city considered as a group.
noun
0
1
the City
  • The financial and commercial district of Greater London.
  • The borough of Manhattan.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the City

Origin of city

  • Middle English cite from Old French from Latin cīvitās from cīvis citizen kei- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English cite, from Old French cité, from Latin cīvitās (“a union of citizens, a citizenry”). Displaced native Middle English burgh, borough (“fortified place, city”) (Modern English borough) and sted, stede (“place, city”) (Modern English stead).

    From Wiktionary