Ward meaning

wôrd
The definition of a ward is a wing of a hospital, a division of a prison, or a person, especially a child, who is dependent upon the care and support of an appointed guardian.

An example of a ward is the children's wing of the hospital.

An example of ward is a child who is in foster care.

noun
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The act of guarding.
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A division of a town for electoral or educational purposes.
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A defensive movement or attitude, especially in fencing; a guard.
noun
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(archaic) To keep watch over; guard; protect.
verb
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To guard; protect.
verb
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A defensive posture, position, or motion, as in fencing.
noun
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A district or division of a city or town, for purposes of administration, representation, voting, etc.
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One of the divisions of a penal institution, such as a prison.
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An open court or area of a castle or fortification enclosed by walls.
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To turn aside; fend off; parry.
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The state of being under guard.
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Each of the parts or divisions of a jail or prison.
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A means of defense or protection.
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An enchantment or spell placed over a designated area, or a social unit, that prevents any tresspasser from entering, approaching and/or even from being able to locate said-protected premises.
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(historical, Scots law) Land tenure through military service.
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To keep in safety, to watch over, to guard.
verb
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To fend off, to repel, to turn aside, as anything mischievous that approaches; -- usually followed by off.
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(intransitive) To be vigilant; to keep guard.
verb
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A person under guardianship.
  • A minor looked after by a guardian.
    After the trial, little Robert was declared a ward of the state.
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A room or division of a hospital set apart for a specific class or group of patients.

A maternity ward.

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(mormon ch.) A local unit presided over by a bishop and two counselors.
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An open space enclosed by the walls of a castle or fortification.
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(archaic) A garrison; the guard or watch.
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(person) (pseud. of Charles Farrar Browne) 1834-67; U.S. humorist.
proper name
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In a (specified) direction.

Inward.

affix
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In a (specified) direction.

Downward.

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A room in a hospital usually holding six or more patients.
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A division in a hospital for the care of a particular group of patients.
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The action of a watchman; monitoring, surveillance (usually in phrases keep ward etc.).
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(fencing) A guarding or defensive motion or position.
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A protected place.
  • (archaic) An area of a castle, corresponding to a circuit of the walls.
  • A section or subdivision of a prison.
  • An administrative division of a borough, city or council.
    On our last visit to Tokyo, we went to Chiyoda ward and visited the Emperor's palace.
  • (UK) A division of a forest.
  • (Mormonism) A subdivision of the LDS Church, smaller than and part of a stake, but larger than a branch.
  • A room in a hospital where patients reside.
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An object used for guarding.
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To defend, to protect.
verb
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(intransitive) To act on the defensive with a weapon.
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pronoun
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A person for whom a guardian has legal responsibility, or one over whose property a guardian has responsibility. Title to legal property remains with the ward, although he or she may not enter into any contracts involving same.
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(archaic or obsolete) A guard; a guardian or watchman.
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Edmund Spenser (c.1552-1599)

The assieged castle's ward / Their steadfast stands did mightily maintain.

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John Dryden (1631-1700)

For want of other ward, / He lifted up his hand, his front to guard.

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Guardianship, especially of a child or prisoner.
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Origin of ward

  • ME -werd < OE -weard < base of weorthan, to become: see worth

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English action of guarding from Old English weard a watching, protection wer-3 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English -weard wer-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English ward, warde, from Old English weard (“watching, ward, protection, guardianship; advance post; waiting for, lurking, ambuscade"), from Proto-Germanic *wardō (“protection, attention, keeping"), an extension of Germanic stem *wara- "attentive" (English wary, beware), from Proto-Indo-European *wer- (“to cover"). Cognate with German Warte (“watchtower"), warten (“wait for"); English guard is a parallel form which came via Old French.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English ward, from Old English weard (“keeper, watchman, guard, guardian, protector; lord, king; possessor"), from Proto-Germanic *warduz (“guard, keeper"), from Proto-Indo-European *wer- (“to heed, defend"). Cognate with German Wart.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English warden, from Old English weardian (“to watch, guard, keep, protect, preserve; hold, possess, occupy, inhabit; rule, govern"), from Proto-Germanic *wardōnÄ… (“to guard"), from Proto-Indo-European *wer- (“to heed, defend").

    From Wiktionary

  • Germanic, cognate with a/to ward, warden, guard etc.

    From Wiktionary