Branch meaning

brănch
The definition of a branch is a part of a plant stem or a part of something which is larger and more complex.

An example of branch is the limb of a tree.

An example of branch is the police force as a part of a community's government.

noun
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To put forth a branch or branches; spread by dividing.
verb
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(chiefly south) A small stream flowing usually into a creek.
noun
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Something that resembles a branch of a tree, as in form or function, as:
  • A secondary outgrowth or subdivision of a main axis, such as the tine of a deer's antlers.
  • (anatomy) An offshoot or a division of the main portion of a structure, especially that of a nerve, blood vessel, or lymphatic vessel; a ramus.
noun
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To embroider with a pattern of flowers, foliage, etc.
verb
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(chemistry) A bifurcation in a linear chain of atoms, especially in an organic molecule where isomeric hydrocarbon groups can vary in the location and number of these bifurcations of the carbon chain.
noun
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(computers) To relinquish control to another set of instructions or another routine as a result of the presence of a branch.
verb
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To embroider (something) with a design of foliage or flowers.
verb
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Something that resembles a branch of a tree, as in form or function, as:
  • A secondary outgrowth or subdivision of a main axis, such as the tine of a deer's antlers.
  • (anatomy) An offshoot or a division of the main portion of a structure, especially that of a nerve, blood vessel, or lymphatic vessel; a ramus.
noun
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To put forth a branch or branches; spread by dividing.
verb
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(1) In a low-level programming language, a statement that directs the computer to go to some other part of the program. In assembly languages, "branch" or "jump" instructions provide this capability. In high-level languages, a "goto" statement, as well as several other programming constructs, provide the equivalent of the branch. For example, "IF A EQUALS B GOTO MATCH_ROUTINE." See branch prediction and do loop.
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The woody part of a tree arising from the trunk and usually dividing.
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Any of the parts of something that divides like the branch of a tree.

The branch of an antler, a chandelier, a river, or a railway.

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(geometry) One of the portions of a curve that extends outwards to an indefinitely great distance.

The branches of a hyperbola.

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A location of an organization with several locations.

Our main branch is downtown, and we have branches in all major suburbs.

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(Mormonism) A local congregation of the LDS Church that is not large enough to form a ward; See ward in LDS church.
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An area in business or of knowledge, research.
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(nautical) A certificate given by Trinity House to a pilot qualified to take navigational control of a ship in British waters.
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(computer architecture) A sequence of code that is conditionally executed.
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(intransitive) To arise from the trunk or a larger branch of a tree.
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(intransitive) To produce branches.
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(intransitive) To divide into separate parts or subdivisions.
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(intransitive, computing) To jump to a different location in a program, especially as the result of a conditional statement.
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Branch means to divide into separate parts or to expand the scope.

An example of branch is for a road to split in two directions.

An example of branch is for a bank to create more local branches.

verb
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A limited part of a larger or more complex unit or system, especially:
  • An area of specialized skill or knowledge, especially academic or vocational, that is related to but separate from other areas.
    The judicial branch of government; the branch of medicine called neurology.
  • A division of a business or other organization.
  • A division of a family, categorized by descent from a particular ancestor.
  • (linguistics) A subdivision of a family of languages, such as the Germanic branch of Indo-European.
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(mathematics) A part of a curve that is separated, as by discontinuities or extreme points.
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To separate (something) into branches.
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Any woody extension growing from the trunk or main stem, or from a main limb, of a tree or shrub.
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Anything physically resembling a branch, as a tine of a deer's antler.
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Any part or extension of a main body or system.
  • A division or part of a body of learning.
    Optics is a branch of physics.
  • A division of a family descending from a common ancestor.
  • A subdivision of a family of languages.
  • A division or a separately located unit of an organization.
    A library branch.
  • A post-office subdivision outside the community where its main post office is located.
  • (comput.) A , esp. one that selects one of two or more alternative instructions as the next executed.
noun
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To put forth branches; spread in or divide into branches; ramify.
verb
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To come out (from the trunk or stem) as a branch.
verb
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To continue at an instruction in another part of the program by means of a branch.
verb
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To separate into branches.
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A line of family descent, in distinction from some other line or lines from the same stock; any descendant in such a line.

The English branch of a family.

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branch off
  • to separate into branches; fork
  • to go off in another direction; diverge
idiom
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branch out
  • to put forth branches
  • to extend the scope of interests, activities, etc.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of branch

  • Middle English from Old French branche from Late Latin branca paw perhaps of Celtic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English branche, braunche, bronche, from Old French branche, brance, from Vulgar Latin branca (“footprint", later also "paw, claw”), of unknown origin, possibly from Gaulish *vranca. Indo-European cognates include Old Norse vró (“angle, corner”), Lithuanian rankà (“hand”), Old Church Slavonic рѫка (rǫka, “hand”), Albanian rangë (“yard work”).

    From Wiktionary