Trunk definition

trŭngk
Frequency:
The body of a human being or animal, not including the head and limbs.
noun
6
0
noun
5
1
Shorts worn by men or boys for athletics, esp. for boxing or swimming.
noun
5
1
A large, reinforced box or chest, used in traveling or for storage, as to hold clothing and personal effects.
noun
4
0
noun
4
1
Advertisement
A compartment in an automobile, usually in the rear, for holding a spare tire, luggage, etc.
noun
3
1
(archit.) The shaft of a column.
noun
3
1
The body of a human excluding the head and limbs.
noun
3
1
The main stem of a blood vessel or nerve apart from the branches.
noun
3
1
A large collecting lymphatic vessel.
noun
3
1
Advertisement
A proboscis, especially the long prehensile proboscis of an elephant.
noun
3
3
The main stem of a tree.
noun
3
3
The long, flexible, prehensile proboscis of an elephant.
noun
2
2
A large, long, boxlike pipe, shaft, etc. for conveying air, water, etc.
noun
2
2
The main body or stem of a nerve, blood vessel, etc., as distinguished from its branches.
noun
1
1
Advertisement
(archaic) A long tube through which pellets of clay, pas, etc., are driven by the force of the breath.
noun
0
0
(mining) A flume or sluice in which ores are separated from the slimes in which they are contained.
noun
0
0
A large pipe forming the piston rod of a steam engine, of sufficient diameter to allow one end of the connecting rod to be attached to the crank, and the other end to pass within the pipe directly to the piston, thus making the engine more compact.
noun
0
0
(mining) To extract (ores) from the slimes in which they are contained, by means of a trunk.
verb
0
0
The thorax of an insect.
noun
2
3
Advertisement
The definition of a trunk is the main base of a tree, person, animal or insect or the long protruding snout of an elephant.

An example of a trunk is the part of a tree from which the branches extend.

An example of a trunk is a person's torso.

An example of a trunk is what an elephant uses to smell and grab things.

noun
0
1
Trunk is defined as a space at the rear of a car used for storage or a large sturdy box used as luggage or for storage.

An example of a trunk is where the spare tire for your car is stored.

noun
0
1
A trunk line.
noun
0
1
A chute or conduit.
noun
0
1
(nautical) Any of certain structures projecting above part of a main deck, as:
  • A covering over the hatches of a ship.
  • An expansion chamber on a tanker.
  • A cabin on a small boat.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
Shorts worn for swimming or other athletics.
noun
0
1
The main woody axis of a tree.
noun
0
1
(architecture) The shaft of a column.
noun
0
1
The body of a human or other vertebrate, excluding the head and limbs.
noun
0
1
The thorax of an insect.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
A main body, apart from tributaries or appendages.
noun
0
1
The main stem of a blood vessel or nerve apart from the branches.
noun
0
1
A watertight shaft connecting two or more decks.
noun
0
1
The housing for the centerboard of a vessel.
noun
0
1
A covered compartment for luggage and storage, generally at the rear of an automobile.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
A large packing case or box that clasps shut, used as luggage or for storage.
noun
0
1
The part of a cabin that extends above a boat's deck.
noun
0
1
A boxlike structure for housing a boat's centerboard.
noun
0
1
A communications circuit that interconnects switches. As such, multiple users and multiple transmissions can share a trunk on a pooled basis, with contention for trunk access managed by an intelligent switching device. There are many types of trunks. Tie trunks connect Private Branch Exchange (PBX) switches in a private network, Central Office Exchange (COE) trunks connect PBXs to telephone company central office exchange switches, and interoffice trunks interconnect central office exchange switches. Trunk groups are groups of trunks serving the same special purpose.Trunks traditionally are directional in nature, with the options being one-way outgoing (originating), one-way incoming (terminating), or twoway (combination).The term trunk comes from the Latin truncus, literally meaning something cut off. Trunk distinguishes the main body of a circuit from the lesser subsidiary lines that come off it, much as the main channel of a river is apart from its lesser tributaries. See also line and trunk group.
0
1
In telecommunications, a high-bandwidth telephone channels connecting switching centers capable of simultaneously handling a high number of voice and data communications. A circuit from a user’s Personal Computer or terminal to a network is more commonly known as “a line” (such as T1 line or ISDN line). The terms circuit, line, and trunk are frequently interchanged. Jupitermedia Corporation. What is trunk? [Online, September 14, 1999.] Jupitermedia Corporation Website. http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/T/trunk.html.
0
1
Advertisement
The (usually single) upright part of a tree, between the roots and the branches: the tree trunk.
noun
0
1
A large suitcase, usually requiring two persons to lift and with a hinged lid.
noun
0
1
A box or chest usually covered with leather, metal, or cloth, or sometimes made of leather, hide, or metal, for holding or transporting clothes or other goods.
noun
0
1
The torso.
noun
0
1
noun
0
1
Advertisement
The proboscis of an insect.
noun
0
1
(architecture) The part of a pilaster between the base and capital, corresponding to the shaft of a column.
noun
0
1
(US, Canada, automotive) The luggage storage compartment of a sedan/saloon style car.
noun
0
1
(US, telecommunications) A circuit between telephone switchboards or other switching equipment.
noun
0
1
A chute or conduit, or a watertight shaft connecting two or more decks.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
A long, large box, pipe, or conductor, made of plank or metal plates, for various uses, as for conveying air to a mine or to a furnace, water to a mill, grain to an elevator, etc.
noun
0
1
(software engineering, jargon) In software projects under source control: the most current source tree, from which the latest unstable builds (so-called "trunk builds") are compiled.
noun
0
1
(transport) A main line in a river, canal, railroad, or highway system.
noun
0
1
The main line or body of anything.

The trunk of a vein or of an artery, as distinct from the branches.

noun
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
trunk
Plural:
trunks

Origin of trunk

  • Middle English trunke from Old French tronc from Latin truncus terə-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English trunke, from Old French tronc (“alms box, tree trunk, headless body"), from Latin truncus (“a stock, lopped tree trunk"), from truncus (“cut off, maimed, mutilated"). For the verb, compare French tronquer, and see truncate.

    From Wiktionary