Body meaning

bŏd'ē
The majority of a number of people or things.
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Substance, density, or consistency, as of a liquid or fabric.
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Anything having real or material substance or form; any physical or perceptible object.
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A separate portion or mass of matter.

A body of land or water.

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Main section.
  • The torso, the main structure of a human or animal frame excluding the extremities (limbs, head, tail). [from 9th c.].
    The boxer took a blow to the body.
  • The largest or most important part of anything, as distinct from its appendages or accessories. [from 11th c.].
    The bumpers and front tyres were ruined, but the body of the car was in remarkable shape.
  • (archaic) The section of a dress extending from the neck to the waist, excluding the arms. [from 16th c.].
    Penny was in the scullery, pressing the body of her new dress.
  • The content of a letter, message, or other printed or electronic document, as distinct from signatures, salutations, headers, and so on. [from 17th c.].
  • A bodysuit. [from 19th c.].
  • (programming) The code of a subroutine, contrasted to its signature and parameters. [from 20th c.].
    In many programming languages, the method body is enclosed in braces.
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Coherent group.
  • A group of men or people having a common purpose or opinion; a mass. [from 16th c.].
    I was escorted from the building by a body of armed security guards.
  • An organisation, company or other authoritative group. [from 17th c.].
    The local train operating company is the managing body for this section of track.
  • A unified collection of details, knowledge or information. [from 17th c.].
    We have now amassed a body of evidence which points to one conclusion.
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A number of persons, concepts, or things regarded as a group.

We walked out in a body.

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The main or central part, as:
  • The largest or principal part of an organ; corpus.
  • The nave of a church.
  • The content of a book or document exclusive of prefatory matter, codicils, indexes, or appendices.
  • The passenger- and cargo-carrying part of an aircraft, ship, or other vehicle.
  • The sound box of an instrument.
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A mass of matter that is distinct from other masses.

A body of water; a celestial body.

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To furnish with a body.
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To give shape to. Usually used with forth:
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A dead person; corpse.
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The main or central part of anything.
  • The part of an automobile, truck, etc. that holds the load or passengers; the part of a vehicle that is not the chassis.
  • The hull of a ship.
  • The fuselage of an aircraft.
  • The main part of a piece of writing as distinguished from headings and introductory or supplementary matter.
  • The sound box of a stringed instrument.
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Any of the natural objects seen in the visible heavens.

The sun, moon, planets, stars, etc. are celestial bodies.

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Richness or fullness of tone or flavor.
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Fullness and resilience.
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A person or something legally regarded as a person.
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The shank of a piece of type.
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To give a body or substance to; make substantial.
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To make part of; embody.
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The largest or principal part of an organ; corpus.
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Material entity.
  • Any physical object or material thing. [from 14th c.].
    All bodies are held together by internal forces.
  • (uncountable) Substance; physical presence. [from 17th c.].
    We have given body to what was just a vague idea.
  • (uncountable) Comparative viscosity, solidity or substance (in wine, colours etc.). [from 17th c.].
    The red wine, sadly, lacked body.
  • An agglomeration of some substance, especially one that would be otherwise uncountable.
    The English Channel is a body of water lying between Great Britain and France.
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(printing) The shank of a type, or the depth of the shank (by which the size is indicated).

A nonpareil face on an agate body.

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To give body or shape to something.
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To construct the bodywork of a car.
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To embody.
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The definition of a body is the physical part of a living thing or the main part of anything.

An example of a body is the human frame.

An example of a body is the outside of a car.

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A collection or quantity, as of material or information.

The body of evidence.

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Consistency of substance, as in paint, textiles, or wine.

A sauce with body.

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The part of a block of type underlying the impression surface.
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The whole physical structure and substance of a human being, animal, or plant.
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The flesh or material substance, as opposed to the spirit.
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A human being; person.
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A group of people or things regarded or functioning as a unit.

A body of soldiers, an advisory body.

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The entire material or physical structure of an organism.
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A corpse.
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The trunk or torso, as distinguished from the head, neck, and extremities.
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Physical frame.
  • The physical structure of a human or animal seen as one single organism. [from 9th c.].
    I saw them walking from a distance, their bodies strangely angular in the dawn light.
  • The fleshly or corporeal nature of a human, as opposed to the spirit or soul. [from 13th c.].
    The body is driven by desires, but the soul is at peace.
  • A corpse. [from 13th c.].
    Her body was found at four o'clock, just two hours after the murder.
  • (archaic or informal except in compounds) A person. [from 13th c.].
    What's a body gotta do to get a drink around here?.
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The physical part of a person, as opposed to the spiritual part.
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take the body
  • To play in a rough physical way, dealing out many body checks, as in hockey.
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body forth
  • To give shape or form to.
  • To symbolize or represent.
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keep body and soul together
  • To stay alive.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

take the body
body forth

Origin of body

  • Middle English bodi from Old English bodig
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English body, bodiȝ, from Old English bodiġ, bodeġ (“body, trunk, chest, torso, height, stature”), from Proto-Germanic *budagą, *budagaz (“body, trunk", also "grown”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewdʰ- (“to be awake, observe”). Cognate with German Bottech (“body, trunk, corpse”), Bavarian and Swabian Bottich (“body, trunk”).
    From Wiktionary