Spirit definition

spĭrĭt
The Holy Spirit.
noun
18
5
A pervading animating principle, essential or characteristic quality, or prevailing tendency or attitude.

The spirit of the Renaissance.

noun
15
3
Life, will, consciousness, thought, etc., regarded as separate from matter.
noun
14
5
The thinking, motivating, feeling part of a person, often as distinguished from the body; mind; intelligence.
noun
5
1
A force or principle believed to animate living beings.
noun
4
0
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A person as characterized by a stated quality.

He is a proud spirit.

noun
7
4
To carry (away, off, etc.) secretly and swiftly, or in some mysterious way.
verb
4
2
The definition of spirit is the soul of a living being, a ghost, mood or loyalty.

An example of spirit is a person's character.

An example of a spirit is the soul of a dead person trapped in the house in which they had lived.

An example of spirit is a hospital patient who has a positive attitude: in good spirit.

An example of spirit is a girl who is a high school cheerleader; a girl with spirit.

noun
3
1
An alcohol solution of an essential or volatile substance.
noun
3
1
An alcoholic beverage, especially distilled liquor.
noun
3
1
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A force or principle believed to animate humans and often to endure after departing from the body of a person at death; the soul.
noun
3
1
The actual though unstated sense or significance of something.

The spirit of the law.

noun
2
0
The part of a human associated with the mind, will, and feelings.

Though unable to join us today, they are with us in spirit.

noun
2
0
The essential nature of a person or group.
noun
2
0
A pervasive or essential attitude, quality, or principle.

The spirit of 1776.

noun
2
0
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A supernatural being.
  • One haunting or possessing a person, house, etc., as a ghost, or thought of as inhabiting a certain region.
  • One of a certain good (or evil) character or influence, as an angel, demon, fairy, or elf.
noun
2
0
A divine animating influence or inspiration.
noun
2
0
One who is vivacious or lively; one who evinces great activity or peculiar characteristics of mind or temper.

A ruling spirit; a schismatic spirit.

noun
2
0
A supernatural being, as:
  • An angel or demon.
  • A being inhabiting or embodying a particular place, object, or natural phenomenon.
  • A fairy or sprite.
noun
3
2
An individual person or personality thought of as showing or having some specific quality.

The brave spirits who pioneered.

noun
2
1
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Real meaning; true intention.

To follow the spirit if not the letter of the law.

noun
1
0
Strong alcoholic liquor produced by distillation.
noun
1
0
(pharmacy) An alcoholic solution of a volatile or essential substance.

Spirits of camphor.

noun
1
0
The life principle, esp. in human beings, originally regarded as inherent in the breath or as infused by a deity.
noun
1
0
Any of certain substances or fluids thought of as permeating organs of the body.
noun
1
0
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Any liquid produced by distillation, as from wood, shale, etc.

Spirits of turpentine.

noun
1
0
Operating by the burning of alcohol.

A spirit lamp.

adjective
1
0
The undying essence of a human; the soul.
noun
1
0
A supernatural being, often but not exclusively without physical form; ghost, fairy, angel.

A wandering spirit haunts the island.

noun
1
0
Enthusiasm and loyalty.

School spirit.

noun
2
2
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The Holy Spirit: in Christian theology, the Third Person of the Blessed Trinity, the three aspects of God.
pronoun
1
1
An inclination or tendency of a specified kind.

Her actions show a generous spirit.

noun
0
0
An attitude marked by enthusiasm, energy, or courage.

Sang with spirit; troops that fought with spirit.

noun
0
0
A mood or emotional state.

The guests were in high spirits. His sour spirits put a damper on the gathering.

noun
0
0
Strong loyalty or dedication.

Team spirit.

noun
0
0
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To carry off mysteriously or secretly.

The documents had been spirited away.

verb
0
0
To impart courage, animation, or determination to; inspirit.
verb
0
0
Frame of mind; disposition; mood; temper.

In high spirits.

noun
0
0
Vivacity, courage, vigor, enthusiasm, etc.

To answer with spirit.

noun
0
0
(dyeing) A solution of a tin salt, etc., used as a mordant.
noun
0
0
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(alchemy) Sulfur, sal ammoniac, mercury, or orpiment.
noun
0
0
To inspirit, animate, encourage, cheer, etc.
verb
0
0
Of spirits or spiritualism.
adjective
0
0
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Believed to be manifested by spirits.

Spirit rapping.

adjective
0
0

School spirit is at an all-time high.

noun
0
0
The manner or style of something.
  • Alexander Pope.
    A perfect judge will read each work of wit / With the same spirit that its author writ.

In the spirit of forgiveness, we didn't press charges.

noun
0
0
(usually in the plural) A volatile liquid, such as alcohol. The plural form spirits is a generic term for distilled alcoholic beverages.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
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Temper or disposition of mind; mental condition or disposition; intellectual or moral state; often in the plural.

To be cheerful, or in good spirits; to be down-hearted, or in bad spirits.

noun
0
0
Spenser.

The mild air, with season moderate, / Gently attempered, and disposed so well, / That still it breathed forth sweet spirit.

noun
0
0
Intent; real meaning; opposed to the letter, or formal statement.

The spirit of an enterprise, or of a document.

noun
0
0
(dyeing) Stannic chloride.
noun
0
0
To carry off, especially in haste, secrecy, or mystery.
verb
0
0
The name given to a Mars exploration rover launched June 10, 2003. See Wikipedia's article.
pronoun
0
0
in spirit
  • furnishing inspiration or moral support, but otherwise not physically present
    He could not attend, but he's here with us in spirit.
idiom
2
0
out of spirits
  • sad; depressed
idiom
1
0
the Spirit
idiom
2
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
spirit
Plural:
spirits

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of spirit

  • Middle English from Old French espirit from Latin spīritus breath from spīrāre to breathe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English spirit, from Old French espirit (“spirit"), from Latin spÄ«ritus (“breath; spirit"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)peys- (“to blow, breathe"). Compare inspire, respire, transpire, all ultimately from Latin spÄ«rō (“I breathe, blow, respire"). Cognate with Old English fisting (“(silent) breaking of wind"). Displaced native Middle English gast (“spirit") (from Old English gāst (“breath, soul, spirit")). More at fist.

    From Wiktionary